How people with diabetes integrate self-monitoring of blood glucose into their self-management strategies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621202
Title:
How people with diabetes integrate self-monitoring of blood glucose into their self-management strategies
Authors:
Bond, Carol S; Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui
Abstract:
Background The benefit of self-monitoring of blood glucose by patients has been questioned, and UK policy is generally not to support this, although it is identified that there may be unidentified subgroups of people who would benefit from being supported to self-monitor. The purpose of this paper is to explore the self-management approaches of people with diabetes, and how self-testing of blood glucose contributes to self-management strategies. Methods This qualitative study of patients’ experiences drew data from contributors to online discussion boards for people living with diabetes. The principles of qualitative content analysis were used on posts from a sample of four Internet discussion boards. Results Contributors described how they were using self-testing within their selfmanagement strategies. Most saw it as a way of actively maintaining control of their condition. The amount of testing carried varied over time; more testing was done in the early days, when people were still learning how to stay in control of their diabetes. Some people had experienced a lack of support for self-testing from healthcare professionals, or had been expected to change their self-management to fit national policy changes. This was seen as unhelpful, demotivating, stressful, and harmful to the doctor–patient relationship. Conclusions The Internet is a valuable source of information about peoples’ selfmanagement behaviours. Patients who are using, or who wish to use, self-testing as part of their self-management strategy are one of the subgroups for whom selftesting is beneficial and who should be supported to do so.
Citation:
How people with diabetes integrate self-monitoring of blood glucose into their self-management strategies 2014, 21 (2):64 Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics
Publisher:
BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT
Journal:
Journal of Innovation in Health Informatics
Issue Date:
26-Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621202
DOI:
10.14236/jhi.v21i1.11
Additional Links:
http://hijournal.bcs.org/index.php/jhi/article/view/11
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2058-4563; 2058-4555
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBond, Carol Sen
dc.contributor.authorHewitt-Taylor, Jaquien
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-26T15:58:14Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-26T15:58:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-26-
dc.identifier.citationHow people with diabetes integrate self-monitoring of blood glucose into their self-management strategies 2014, 21 (2):64 Journal of Innovation in Health Informaticsen
dc.identifier.issn2058-4563-
dc.identifier.issn2058-4555-
dc.identifier.doi10.14236/jhi.v21i1.11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621202-
dc.description.abstractBackground The benefit of self-monitoring of blood glucose by patients has been questioned, and UK policy is generally not to support this, although it is identified that there may be unidentified subgroups of people who would benefit from being supported to self-monitor. The purpose of this paper is to explore the self-management approaches of people with diabetes, and how self-testing of blood glucose contributes to self-management strategies. Methods This qualitative study of patients’ experiences drew data from contributors to online discussion boards for people living with diabetes. The principles of qualitative content analysis were used on posts from a sample of four Internet discussion boards. Results Contributors described how they were using self-testing within their selfmanagement strategies. Most saw it as a way of actively maintaining control of their condition. The amount of testing carried varied over time; more testing was done in the early days, when people were still learning how to stay in control of their diabetes. Some people had experienced a lack of support for self-testing from healthcare professionals, or had been expected to change their self-management to fit national policy changes. This was seen as unhelpful, demotivating, stressful, and harmful to the doctor–patient relationship. Conclusions The Internet is a valuable source of information about peoples’ selfmanagement behaviours. Patients who are using, or who wish to use, self-testing as part of their self-management strategy are one of the subgroups for whom selftesting is beneficial and who should be supported to do so.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBCS, The Chartered Institute for ITen
dc.relation.urlhttp://hijournal.bcs.org/index.php/jhi/article/view/11en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Innovation in Health Informaticsen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectDiabetes mellitusen
dc.subjectinterneten
dc.subjectself-managementen
dc.subjectself-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG)en
dc.subjectsocial mediaen
dc.titleHow people with diabetes integrate self-monitoring of blood glucose into their self-management strategiesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Innovation in Health Informaticsen
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