2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621115
Title:
Sex Sells (Out): Neoliberalism and Erotic Fan Fiction
Authors:
Byrne, Aidan ( 0000-0001-5499-9794 ) ; Fleming, Samantha
Abstract:
Fiction by fans is not new: despite the development of copyright law in the eighteenth century, unofficial sequels were common. For example, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela (1740) was followed by anonymous and pseudonymous sequels and satires, including Pamela’s Conduct in High Life (1741) and Conny Keyber’s (Henry Fielding’s) An Apology for the Life of Mrs Shamela Andrews (1741). The commercial publishing world still produces such work: Jane Austen sequels and retellings include Arielle Eckstut’s Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen, Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2009), Mitzi Szereto’s Pride and Prejudice: Hidden Lusts (2011), P. D. James’s Death Comes To Pemberley (2011), Jo Baker’s Longbourn (2014), Val McDermid’s Northanger Abbey (2015), and Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible (2016). The market recognizes and legitimizes consumer demand for derivative fiction.
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell
Journal:
Journal of Popular Culture
Issue Date:
Aug-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621115
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1540-5931
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0022-3840
Appears in Collections:
CTTR

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Aidanen
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Samanthaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-15T14:39:24Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-15T14:39:24Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3840en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621115-
dc.description.abstractFiction by fans is not new: despite the development of copyright law in the eighteenth century, unofficial sequels were common. For example, Samuel Richardson’s Pamela (1740) was followed by anonymous and pseudonymous sequels and satires, including Pamela’s Conduct in High Life (1741) and Conny Keyber’s (Henry Fielding’s) An Apology for the Life of Mrs Shamela Andrews (1741). The commercial publishing world still produces such work: Jane Austen sequels and retellings include Arielle Eckstut’s Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen, Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2009), Mitzi Szereto’s Pride and Prejudice: Hidden Lusts (2011), P. D. James’s Death Comes To Pemberley (2011), Jo Baker’s Longbourn (2014), Val McDermid’s Northanger Abbey (2015), and Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible (2016). The market recognizes and legitimizes consumer demand for derivative fiction.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1540-5931en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectfan fictionen
dc.subjectcultural studiesen
dc.subjectliterary studiesen
dc.subjecteroticaen
dc.subjectpornographyen
dc.subjectpopular cultureen
dc.subjectneoliberalismen
dc.titleSex Sells (Out): Neoliberalism and Erotic Fan Fictionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Popular Cultureen
dc.date.accepted2018-02-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW150218ABen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-08-01en
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