Is perception of quality more important than technical quality in patient video cases?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621047
Title:
Is perception of quality more important than technical quality in patient video cases?
Authors:
Roland, Damian; Matheson, David ( 0000-0002-3695-3167 ) ; Taub, Nick; Coats, Tim; Lakhanpaul, Monica
Abstract:
Background The use of video cases to demonstrate key signs and symptoms in patients (patient video cases or PVCs) is a rapidly expanding field. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the technical quality, or judgement of quality, of a video clip influences a paediatrician’s judgment on acuity of the case and assess the relationship between perception of quality and the technical quality of a selection of video clips. Methods Participants (12 senior consultant paediatricians attending an examination workshop) individually categorised 28 PVCs into one of 3 possible acuities and then described the quality of the image seen. The PVCs had been converted into four different technical qualities (differing bit rates ranging from excellent to low quality). Results Participants’ assessment of quality and the actual industry standard of the PVC were independent (333 distinct observations, spearmans rho = 0.0410, p = 0.4564). Agreement between actual acuity and participants’ judgement was generally good at higher acuities but moderate at medium/low acuities of illness (overall correlation 0.664). Perception of the quality of the clip was related to correct assignment of acuity regardless of the technical quality of the clip (number of obs = 330, z = 2.07, p = 0.038). Conclusions It is important to benchmark PVCs prior to use in learning resources as experts may not agree on the information within, or quality of, the clip. It appears, although PVCs may be beneficial in a pedagogical context, the perception of quality of clip may be an important determinant of an expert’s decision making.
Citation:
Is perception of quality more important than technical quality in patient video cases? 2015, 15 (1) BMC Medical Education
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
BMC Medical Education
Issue Date:
13-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/621047
DOI:
10.1186/s12909-015-0419-x
Additional Links:
http://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909-015-0419-x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1472-6920
Sponsors:
NIHR
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoland, Damianen
dc.contributor.authorMatheson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorTaub, Nicken
dc.contributor.authorCoats, Timen
dc.contributor.authorLakhanpaul, Monicaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-30T10:10:12Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-30T10:10:12Z-
dc.date.issued2015-08-13-
dc.identifier.citationIs perception of quality more important than technical quality in patient video cases? 2015, 15 (1) BMC Medical Educationen
dc.identifier.issn1472-6920-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12909-015-0419-x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621047-
dc.description.abstractBackground The use of video cases to demonstrate key signs and symptoms in patients (patient video cases or PVCs) is a rapidly expanding field. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the technical quality, or judgement of quality, of a video clip influences a paediatrician’s judgment on acuity of the case and assess the relationship between perception of quality and the technical quality of a selection of video clips. Methods Participants (12 senior consultant paediatricians attending an examination workshop) individually categorised 28 PVCs into one of 3 possible acuities and then described the quality of the image seen. The PVCs had been converted into four different technical qualities (differing bit rates ranging from excellent to low quality). Results Participants’ assessment of quality and the actual industry standard of the PVC were independent (333 distinct observations, spearmans rho = 0.0410, p = 0.4564). Agreement between actual acuity and participants’ judgement was generally good at higher acuities but moderate at medium/low acuities of illness (overall correlation 0.664). Perception of the quality of the clip was related to correct assignment of acuity regardless of the technical quality of the clip (number of obs = 330, z = 2.07, p = 0.038). Conclusions It is important to benchmark PVCs prior to use in learning resources as experts may not agree on the information within, or quality of, the clip. It appears, although PVCs may be beneficial in a pedagogical context, the perception of quality of clip may be an important determinant of an expert’s decision making.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNIHRen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmcmededuc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12909-015-0419-xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC Medical Educationen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectpatient video clipsen
dc.subjectperception of qualityen
dc.subjecttechnical qualityen
dc.subjectpostgraduate medical educationen
dc.titleIs perception of quality more important than technical quality in patient video cases?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Medical Educationen
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