Testing the relations of gelotophobia with humour as a coping strategy, self-ascribed loneliness, reflectivity, attractiveness, self-acceptance, and life expectations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620778
Title:
Testing the relations of gelotophobia with humour as a coping strategy, self-ascribed loneliness, reflectivity, attractiveness, self-acceptance, and life expectations
Authors:
Führ, Martin; Platt, Tracey; T. Proyer, René
Abstract:
Gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) was studied in a sample of N = 1,322 Danish adolescents aged 11 to 16. When using a measure of coping humour in three different respects (using humour (1) to overcome uncertainty and stress, (2) in relation to aggression and sexuality, and (3) to get cheered up), it was indicated that the fear of being laughed at existed independently from the use of humour as a coping strategy. It is suggested that interventions targeting the positive use of laughter and humour may have a potential for increasing the well-being of adolescents with high levels of the fear of being laughed at. In single item ratings higher levels of gelotophobia were associated with greater self-ascribed loneliness, lower perceived attractiveness, lower self-acceptance, and rather negative life expectancies. Findings are discussed in the light of current literature and with respect to potential implications for the school life of adolescents.
Citation:
Testing the relations of gelotophobia with humour as a coping strategy, self-ascribed loneliness, reflectivity, attractiveness, self-acceptance, and life expectations 2015, 3 (1):84 European Journal of Humour Research
Publisher:
EJHR
Journal:
European Journal of Humour Research
Issue Date:
Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620778
DOI:
10.7592/EJHR2015.3.1.fuhr
Additional Links:
http://www.europeanjournalofhumour.org/index.php/ejhr/article/view/87/pdf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2307700X
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFühr, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorPlatt, Traceyen
dc.contributor.authorT. Proyer, Renéen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-17T13:36:04Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-17T13:36:04Z-
dc.date.issued2015-03-
dc.identifier.citationTesting the relations of gelotophobia with humour as a coping strategy, self-ascribed loneliness, reflectivity, attractiveness, self-acceptance, and life expectations 2015, 3 (1):84 European Journal of Humour Researchen
dc.identifier.issn2307700X-
dc.identifier.doi10.7592/EJHR2015.3.1.fuhr-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620778-
dc.description.abstractGelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) was studied in a sample of N = 1,322 Danish adolescents aged 11 to 16. When using a measure of coping humour in three different respects (using humour (1) to overcome uncertainty and stress, (2) in relation to aggression and sexuality, and (3) to get cheered up), it was indicated that the fear of being laughed at existed independently from the use of humour as a coping strategy. It is suggested that interventions targeting the positive use of laughter and humour may have a potential for increasing the well-being of adolescents with high levels of the fear of being laughed at. In single item ratings higher levels of gelotophobia were associated with greater self-ascribed loneliness, lower perceived attractiveness, lower self-acceptance, and rather negative life expectancies. Findings are discussed in the light of current literature and with respect to potential implications for the school life of adolescents.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEJHRen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.europeanjournalofhumour.org/index.php/ejhr/article/view/87/pdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European Journal of Humour Researchen
dc.subjectgelotophobiaen
dc.subjectcoping humouren
dc.subjectlonelinessen
dc.subjectself-acceptanceen
dc.titleTesting the relations of gelotophobia with humour as a coping strategy, self-ascribed loneliness, reflectivity, attractiveness, self-acceptance, and life expectationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Humour Researchen
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