Socioeconomic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in England

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620699
Title:
Socioeconomic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in England
Authors:
Chizia, O S; Bellingham-Young, Denise ( 0000-0003-4962-6752 )
Abstract:
Background: The rise in diabetes worldwide and its significance as a cause of disability and premature death has increased the interest of researchers in diabetes mellitus. There is a large volume of published studies describing the role of factors such as income, poor education, inadequate housing conditions and unemployment as key social determinants in the development and progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study therefore set out to investigate the main socioeconomic predictors of T2D in England. Methods: Based on the available literature on the socioeconomic determinants of T2D, the variables, unemployment (long-term and short-term), overcrowding, income deprivation and no qualification were selected. Data on the socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of type 2 diabetes were retrieved online from the registry of the Office for National Statistics and the Health and Social Care Information Centre respectively. This was done specifically for the 64 randomly selected districts in England. Following preliminary analysis, multiple regression was conducted to ensure there was no violation of the assumptions of regression. Results: Correlation indicates a significant moderate positive correlation between the prevalence of T2D and each of the variables: long-term unemployment, no qualifications and income deprivation, but no significant relationship with overcrowding. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that long-term unemployment and no qualification were significant predictors of T2D in England. Conclusions: The evidence from this study suggests that the prioritisation of resources, especially in periods of austerity and welfare reforms, to target these key predictors may achieve much in reducing the prevalence of T2D in England. Hence, it is recommended that a comprehensive data collection of these demographic characteristics are integrated into the existing process, and the collective effects of social, economic and biologic factors are investigated in future studies.
Publisher:
University of Wolverhampton
Journal:
Journal of Health and Social Care Improvement, Volume 1 issue 3, pp52-61
Issue Date:
Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620699
Additional Links:
https://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/centre-for-health-and-social-care-improvement-chsci/journal-of-health-and-social-care-improvement/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1756-6657
Appears in Collections:
FEHW

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChizia, O Sen
dc.contributor.authorBellingham-Young, Deniseen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-27T10:58:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-27T10:58:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-
dc.identifier.issn1756-6657en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620699-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The rise in diabetes worldwide and its significance as a cause of disability and premature death has increased the interest of researchers in diabetes mellitus. There is a large volume of published studies describing the role of factors such as income, poor education, inadequate housing conditions and unemployment as key social determinants in the development and progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study therefore set out to investigate the main socioeconomic predictors of T2D in England. Methods: Based on the available literature on the socioeconomic determinants of T2D, the variables, unemployment (long-term and short-term), overcrowding, income deprivation and no qualification were selected. Data on the socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of type 2 diabetes were retrieved online from the registry of the Office for National Statistics and the Health and Social Care Information Centre respectively. This was done specifically for the 64 randomly selected districts in England. Following preliminary analysis, multiple regression was conducted to ensure there was no violation of the assumptions of regression. Results: Correlation indicates a significant moderate positive correlation between the prevalence of T2D and each of the variables: long-term unemployment, no qualifications and income deprivation, but no significant relationship with overcrowding. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that long-term unemployment and no qualification were significant predictors of T2D in England. Conclusions: The evidence from this study suggests that the prioritisation of resources, especially in periods of austerity and welfare reforms, to target these key predictors may achieve much in reducing the prevalence of T2D in England. Hence, it is recommended that a comprehensive data collection of these demographic characteristics are integrated into the existing process, and the collective effects of social, economic and biologic factors are investigated in future studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.wlv.ac.uk/research/institutes-and-centres/centre-for-health-and-social-care-improvement-chsci/journal-of-health-and-social-care-improvement/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectType 2 diabetesen
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectunemploymenten
dc.subjectincome deprivation and overcrowdingen
dc.titleSocioeconomic Determinants of Type 2 Diabetes in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Health and Social Care Improvement, Volume 1 issue 3, pp52-61en
dc.date.accepted2017-09-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW270917DBYen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-10-30en
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