Improved correlation between animal and human potency of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620640
Title:
Improved correlation between animal and human potency of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs)
Authors:
Dearden, J. C.; Hewitt, M.; Bresnen, G. M.; Gregg, C. N.
Abstract:
Animal models are known not to predict human responses well, in general. However, we have been able to demonstrate that, for a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that are or were in clinical use, the incorporation of two simple physicochemical properties results in excellent correlations between human and rodent potencies for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities. This has the potential to allow the use of historical data to improve drug development.
Citation:
Improved correlation between animal and human potency of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs) 2017, 28 (7):557 SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
SAR and QSAR in Environmental Research
Issue Date:
25-Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620640
DOI:
10.1080/1062936X.2017.1351391
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1062936X.2017.1351391
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1062-936X
Appears in Collections:
FSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDearden, J. C.en
dc.contributor.authorHewitt, M.en
dc.contributor.authorBresnen, G. M.en
dc.contributor.authorGregg, C. N.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-31T13:25:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-31T13:25:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.identifier.citationImproved correlation between animal and human potency of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs) 2017, 28 (7):557 SAR and QSAR in Environmental Researchen
dc.identifier.issn1062-936Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1062936X.2017.1351391-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620640-
dc.description.abstractAnimal models are known not to predict human responses well, in general. However, we have been able to demonstrate that, for a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that are or were in clinical use, the incorporation of two simple physicochemical properties results in excellent correlations between human and rodent potencies for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities. This has the potential to allow the use of historical data to improve drug development.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1062936X.2017.1351391en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to SAR and QSAR in Environmental Researchen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectHuman–animal drug test correlationsen
dc.subjectQSARen
dc.subjectanalgesic activityen
dc.subject; anti-inflammatory activityen
dc.subjectanti-pyretic activityen
dc.subjectnon-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugsen
dc.titleImproved correlation between animal and human potency of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs using quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSAR and QSAR in Environmental Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Pharmacy, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK-
dc.date.accepted2017-07-
rioxxterms.funderInternalen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW310817MHen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-03en
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