Gender, money and professional identity: medical social work and the coming of the British National Health Service

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620625
Title:
Gender, money and professional identity: medical social work and the coming of the British National Health Service
Authors:
Gosling, George Campbell
Abstract:
The arrival of the British National Health Service (NHS) in 1948 heralded significant changes for all health workers, but the establishment of a ‘free’ health service was especially meaningful for the hospital almoners—or medical social workers, as they were starting to be known—who had previously been responsible for the assessment and collection of patient payments. It was on this basis they had gained a foothold in the hospital, capitalising on gendered assumptions of financial understanding and behaviour. Yet what might have caused an identity crisis was embraced. This was a dual strategy of both repositioning the profession in alignment with the planned NHS and of asserting an enhanced professional status by distancing themselves from the handling of payment. It was an episode in the history of this distinctly female profession that speaks to women’s historic relationship with money.
Citation:
Gender, money and professional identity: medical social work and the coming of the British National Health Service 2017:1 Women's History Review
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Women's History Review
Issue Date:
14-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620625
DOI:
10.1080/09612025.2017.1328760
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09612025.2017.1328760
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0961-2025
Sponsors:
Wellcome Trust
Appears in Collections:
FOSS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGosling, George Campbellen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-30T08:40:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-30T08:40:29Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-14-
dc.identifier.citationGender, money and professional identity: medical social work and the coming of the British National Health Service 2017:1 Women's History Reviewen
dc.identifier.issn0961-2025en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09612025.2017.1328760-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620625-
dc.description.abstractThe arrival of the British National Health Service (NHS) in 1948 heralded significant changes for all health workers, but the establishment of a ‘free’ health service was especially meaningful for the hospital almoners—or medical social workers, as they were starting to be known—who had previously been responsible for the assessment and collection of patient payments. It was on this basis they had gained a foothold in the hospital, capitalising on gendered assumptions of financial understanding and behaviour. Yet what might have caused an identity crisis was embraced. This was a dual strategy of both repositioning the profession in alignment with the planned NHS and of asserting an enhanced professional status by distancing themselves from the handling of payment. It was an episode in the history of this distinctly female profession that speaks to women’s historic relationship with money.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trusten
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09612025.2017.1328760en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Women's History Reviewen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectSocial worken
dc.subjectprofessional identityen
dc.subjectNational Health Serviceen
dc.subjecthospitalen
dc.subjectmoneyen
dc.titleGender, money and professional identity: medical social work and the coming of the British National Health Serviceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalWomen's History Reviewen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Social, Historical and Political Studies, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK-
dc.date.accepted2017-06-
rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trusten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectProject grant numbers 083402 and 104837/Z/14/Zen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-30en
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