2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620622
Title:
Stimulation of Indigenous Carbonate Precipitating Bacteria for Ground Improvement
Authors:
Rajasekar, Adharsh; Moy, Charles K S; Wilkinson, Stephen ( 0000-0001-9400-4747 )
Abstract:
Calcite minerals are precipitated in soil through biomineralisation which can be either organic or inorganic in nature. Biomineralisation can be employed to improve ground conditions in its natural state. Usually, studies of applied biomineralisation are highly interdisciplinary involving expertise from engineers, chemists and microbiologists. In this paper, we study the potential of biomineralisation from indigenous bacteria present in soil. The soil samples were collected from a high permeable zone and the bacteria that inhabit the soil were stimulated at a temperature of 15°C. A cementation solution consisting of 500mM calcium chloride, urea and nutrient broth at a pH of 7.5 was added to the soil samples. Inorganic precipitation was found to be dominant and was more efficient when compared to organic precipitation. Carbonate precipitation data indicated that inorganic precipitation were 1.37 times better at carbonate formation in comparison to organic precipitation. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis identified cementation bonds formed between soil particles. It was deducted that organic precipitation is dependent on temperature, and may take an extended time at such low temperature. The preliminary data presented in this paper suggests that the implementation of biomineralisation with in-situ microbes is promising but requires further laboratory and field investigation before being considered for engineering application.
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Journal:
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Issue Date:
May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2436/620622
Additional Links:
http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/68/1/012010/pdf
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
1755-1307
Sponsors:
XJTLU
Appears in Collections:
Construction and Infrastructure

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRajasekar, Adharshen
dc.contributor.authorMoy, Charles K Sen
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-29T14:05:18Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-29T14:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-
dc.identifier.issn1755-1307en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/620622-
dc.description.abstractCalcite minerals are precipitated in soil through biomineralisation which can be either organic or inorganic in nature. Biomineralisation can be employed to improve ground conditions in its natural state. Usually, studies of applied biomineralisation are highly interdisciplinary involving expertise from engineers, chemists and microbiologists. In this paper, we study the potential of biomineralisation from indigenous bacteria present in soil. The soil samples were collected from a high permeable zone and the bacteria that inhabit the soil were stimulated at a temperature of 15°C. A cementation solution consisting of 500mM calcium chloride, urea and nutrient broth at a pH of 7.5 was added to the soil samples. Inorganic precipitation was found to be dominant and was more efficient when compared to organic precipitation. Carbonate precipitation data indicated that inorganic precipitation were 1.37 times better at carbonate formation in comparison to organic precipitation. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis identified cementation bonds formed between soil particles. It was deducted that organic precipitation is dependent on temperature, and may take an extended time at such low temperature. The preliminary data presented in this paper suggests that the implementation of biomineralisation with in-situ microbes is promising but requires further laboratory and field investigation before being considered for engineering application.en
dc.description.sponsorshipXJTLUen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/68/1/012010/pdfen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectBiomineralisationen
dc.subjectGround Improvementen
dc.subjectMICPen
dc.titleStimulation of Indigenous Carbonate Precipitating Bacteria for Ground Improvementen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.identifier.journalIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Scienceen
dc.date.accepted2017-05-
rioxxterms.funderXJTLUen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW290817SWen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/CC BY-NC-ND 4.0en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-29en
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