Now showing items 1-20 of 4037

    • Exploring postcolonial trauma in Nigeria as stimulus for creating new plays

      Agboaye, Isikhuemen (2018-06-01)
      This research is situated within the practice-led method, enabling me as a playwright to gain stimulus for creating trauma informed plays. The framework for creating such plays in this research is the centre-periphery concept (Ashcroft, Griffiths and Tiffin, 2013, 43) situated with the imagined nation as backdrops for understanding postcolonial trauma. In order to gain stimulus for playwriting in this research, I explored Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart and Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman to understanding postcolonial trauma in my part of Africa, being Nigeria. I also explored other sources for the purpose of gaining stimulus from embedded trauma motifs, useful for writing The Longest Snake, The Endless Walk and the Alternative plays. The Alternative plays draw meanings from the initial plays and are interventive and socio-dramatic; revealing how trauma may be understood from other perspectives. The originality of this research and contribution to knowledge may be perceived in the new plays which incorporate trauma notions; the role of the ‘circle’ in conceptualisation and the use of the ‘centre-periphery’ concepts as template for playwriting and analysis. The originality may also be inferred from the interventive relevance of the created plays, touching on how postcolonial trauma may be understood from the lens of the imagined nation, and events in the centre-periphery context. It is also important to mention how the collectives are traumatically affected by the negative effects of colonisation as mirrored in the textual sources explored. Equally relevant are my personal experiences and the African folklore and folktale milieu, which are relevant for understanding postcolonial trauma through praxis; reiterating Gray and Marlins’ (2016: 2) thoughts that ‘We learn most effectively by doing – by active experience, and reflection on that experience,’ which may be seen in the context of the practice-led approach I adopted in this research.
    • Minding the gap - From disparity to beyond

      Cureton, Debra; Cousins, Glynis (SRHE Annual Research Conference, 2013-12-11)
      The sector wide differences in the attainment of students categorised as Black Minority Ethnic (BME) and as white increases, despite the good degrees gained by students categorised as BME rising year on year (ECU, 2012). In this research staff and student perceptions of the attainment gap are explored and initiatives to reduce the gap are implemented. The research identified four areas that are crucial to student success and contribute to gap:  the quality of learning relationships  pedagogic factors: i.e. the clarity of assignment briefs  psychosocial barriers: i.e. student expectation, belongingness, aspiration raising and fear of stereotype threats  social capital: i.e. understanding the HE rules of engagement and degree classifications On conclusion of the programme the University saw a 2% decrease in its attainment gap. This work continues through the What Works Change Programme and considers how assessment practices can impact of student retention, progression, success and sense of belongingness.
    • Peer mentoring for staff development in a changing work environment

      Cureton, Debra; Green, P.; Meakin, L. (The International Journal of Evidence Based Coaching and Mentoring, 2010-06-30)
      This paper details the impact of a formalised staff mentoring scheme on people working in a University in the United Kingdom. It considers aspects of a changing political agenda on the working lives of employees and considers how mentoring can mediate its negative effects. Evaluation data indicates that the scheme provides developmental opportunities, contact with others, emotional support and the opportunity for reflection. It is suggested that these findings are transferable to other large, changing, organisational environments where a variety of occupational groups are employed.
    • Factors of success for formal mentoring in Higher Education: Exploration through autoethnography

      Cureton, Debra (EMCC, 2010-07-31)
      An auto-ethnographical methodology was used to collect field notes and reflective data over a three year period, which focused on the implementation of a formal staff mentoring scheme within a Higher Education setting. Through the analysis of collected data, observations about the implementation, process and outcomes have been made. Suggestions about the interactional nature of time invested into a mentoring relationship, the nature of the mentoring relationship, personal and organisational investment and the benefits of mentoring have also been proposed.
    • Supporting students’ learning: The power of the student–teacher relationship

      Cureton, Debra; Gravestock, Phil (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-07-06)
      The learning relationship between students and those who teach them is intrinsic to student success (Thomas, Building student engagement and belonging at a time of change in higher education. London: Paul Hamlyn Foundation, 2012). Moreover, one of the factors that can lead to differential outcomes in student success is believed to stem from differences in the perceived and experienced learning relationships between students and their lecturers (Cousin and Cureton, Disparities in student attainment (DiSA). York: Higher Education Academy, 2012). This chapter considers the components of the student and teacher learning relationship that encourage students to be successful, and the multi-layered and multifaceted factors that can affect such relationships. The chapter will draw on the wider literature around learning relationships, whilst providing illustrative case studies from two research programmes: Disparities in Student Attainment (DiSA) and phase two of the What Works? project.
    • The student psychological contract

      Cureton, Debra; Cousins, Glynis (HE Academy, 2012-10-31)
    • The Impact of Mentoring on Stress in Higher Education

      Cureton, Debra; Jones, Jennifer; Foster, William (The International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching, 2011-06-01)
      The aim of this research is to understand the association between stress and involvement in a mentoring relationship within a higher education context. Three studies were carried out, within the same large UK University targeting both mentees and mentors involvement in one particular mentoring scheme, for their views and perceptions about mentoring and stress. The keys findings within this case study are that mentoring does allow both mentors and mentees to feel supported, particularly in times of pressure and stress. Mentoring helps to raise self-awareness, confidence levels and helps further develop professional relationships for both parties. Through engaging in ongoing reflection together, mentors and mentees feel that mentoring has had a positive impact on their work-related stress and has provided them with coping strategies. Ultimately, the suggestion is that involvement in mentoring provides strategies for coping with situations, the opportunity to reflect and leads to feeling valued.
    • Disparities in student attainment: The University of Wolverhampton final report

      Cousins, Glynis; Cureton, Debra (HE Academy, 2012-10-31)
      This project was the result of a the National Teaching Fellowship Scheme (NTFS) project fund initiative funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and managed by the Higher Education Academy (HEA). The research discussed in this document has been carried out across two Higher Education Institutions in the Midlands: Coventry University and the University of Wolverhampton.
    • What works? The University of Wolverhampton final report

      Cureton, Debra (Paul Hamlyn Foundation, 2016-07-31)
    • Species

      Kaburu, Stefano S. K (Springer, 2019-02-08)
    • Rank acquisition in rhesus macaque yearlings following permanent maternal separation: The importance of the social and physical environment

      Wooddell, Lauren J.; Kaburu, Stefano S. K; Murphy, Ashley M.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Dettmer, Amanda M. (Wiley, 2017-08-18)
      Rank acquisition is a developmental milestone for young primates, but the processes by which primate yearlings attain social rank in the absence of the mother remain unclear. We studied 18 maternally reared yearling rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) that differed in their social and physical rearing environments. We found that early social experience and maternal rank, but not individual traits (weight, sex, age), predicted dominance acquisition in the new peer‐only social group. Yearlings also used coalitions to reinforce the hierarchy, and social affiliation (play and grooming) was likely a product, rather than a determinant, of rank acquisition. Following relocation to a familiar environment, significant rank changes occurred indicating that familiarity with a physical environment was salient in rank acquisition. Our results add to the growing body of literature emphasizing the role of the social and physical environment on behavioral development, namely social asymmetries among peers.
    • Handling newborn monkeys alters later exploratory, cognitive, and social behaviors

      Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Sclafani, Valentina; Paukner, Annika; Kaburu, Stefano S. K; Suomi, Stephen J.; Ferrari, Pier F (Elsevier, 2017-08-18)
      Touch is one of the first senses to develop and one of the earliest modalities for infant-caregiver communication. While studies have explored the benefits of infant touch in terms of physical health and growth, the effects of social touch on infant behavior are relatively unexplored. Here, we investigated the influence of neonatal handling on a variety of domains, including memory, novelty seeking, and social interest, in infant monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n = 48) from 2 to 12 weeks of age. Neonates were randomly assigned to receive extra holding, with or without accompanying face-to-face interactions. Extra-handled infants, compared to standard-reared infants, exhibited less stress-related behavior and more locomotion around a novel environment, faster approach of novel objects, better working memory, and less fear towards a novel social partner. In sum, infants who received more tactile stimulation in the neonatal period subsequently demonstrated more advanced motor, social, and cognitive skills—particularly in contexts involving exploration of novelty—in the first three months of life. These data suggest that social touch may support behavioral development, offering promising possibilities for designing future early interventions, particularly for infants who are at heightened risk for social disorders.
    • Diary of a Well-Maker: a note on crafts as research practice

      Hackney, Fiona; Rana, Mah (Plymouth College of Art, 2018-11-30)
      This paper signals the value of making for well-being as a reflexive research activity. It focuses on a series of short reflective diary entries created by artist and researcher Mah Rana during her daily encounters with people, spaces, places, and things. The entries are personal and incidental, involve memories and snippets of conversation but, crucially, they are all positioned from her perspective as a self-identified ‘well-maker’. Someone, that is, who is alert to the particular values, benefits, qualities, and characteristics of creative making for mental and physical health: who takes note of how these manifest in our everyday lives, often in the quietest of ways.
    • Designing a sensibility for sustainable clothing

      Hackney, Fiona; Saunders, Clare; Willett, Joanie; West, Jodie; Hill, Katie (Environmental Audit Committee, 2018-10-10)
    • Dress and textiles network: Heritage and design in the West Midlands

      Hackney, Fiona (MUPI: Museum-University Partnership Initiative, 2018-10-10)
    • Gender differences in research areas, methods and topics: Can people and thing orientations explain the results?

      Thelwall, Mike; Bailey, Carol; Tobin, Catherine; Bradshaw, Noel-Ann (Elsevier, 2019-12-31)
      Although the gender gap in academia has narrowed, females are underrepresented within some fields in the USA. Prior research suggests that the imbalances between science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields may be partly due to greater male interest in things and greater female interest in people, or to off-putting masculine cultures in some disciplines. To seek more detailed insights across all subjects, this article compares practising US male and female researchers between and within 285 narrow Scopus fields inside 26 broad fields from their first-authored articles published in 2017. The comparison is based on publishing fields and the words used in article titles, abstracts, and keywords. The results cannot be fully explained by the people/thing dimensions. Exceptions include greater female interest in veterinary science and cell biology and greater male interest in abstraction, patients, and power/control fields, such as politics and law. These may be due to other factors, such as the ability of a career to provide status or social impact or the availability of alternative careers. As a possible side effect of the partial people/thing relationship, females are more likely to use exploratory and qualitative methods and males are more likely to use quantitative methods. The results suggest that the necessary steps of eliminating explicit and implicit gender bias in academia are insufficient and might be complemented by measures to make fields more attractive to minority genders.
    • Education policies on access and reduction of poverty: Thecase of Ghana

      Dzidza, Peter Mawunyo; Jackson, Ian; Normanyo, Amatefee K.; Walsh, Michael; Ikejiaku, Brian-Vincent (Professors World Peace Academy, 2019-12-31)
    • The effects of poverty reduction strategies on artisanal fishing in Ghana: The case of Keta municipality

      Dzidza, Peter Mawunyo; Jackson, Ian; Normanyo, Amatefee K.; Walsh, Michael (Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2017-05-31)
      This paper assesses the level of poverty in Ghana after three decades of successive implementation of numerous poverty reduction strategies including Structural Adjustment Program (SAP) by various governments of Ghana. The Keta municipality in the Volta region, where artisanal fishing thrives, was chosen as a representative sample of the whole country. The authors identified eleven artisanal fishing communities in the selected area using systematic sampling. Data were collected on household consumption patterns. This process was used to determine the profile of poverty using the latest upper poverty line of Ghana and the Greer and Thorbecke (1984) poverty formula. Research findings show that the various poverty alleviation methods implemented over three decades by the Government of Ghana, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) significantly failed as they have not produced any meaningful effect on poverty reduction in the sample area. Finally, this paper offers further suggestions regarding how this poverty gap may be bridged using alternative methods.