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dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Colin A.
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-08T15:31:57Z
dc.date.available2007-03-08T15:31:57Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.date.submitted2007-03-08
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Soil and Water Conservation, 61(4): 236-241
dc.identifier.issn0022-4561
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/9866
dc.descriptionMetadata only
dc.description.abstractInvestigations assessed the potential contribution of grass-ley set-aside to soil conservation. Ten runoff plots (7 to 15o, 12 to 27 percent gradients) at the Hilton Experimental Site, England, were put to ley in 1991, simulating one specific set-aside land-use. Runoff and erosion rates were low, despite potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0.24 percent of precipitation (standard deviation 0.20), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0.13 percent (standard deviation 0.04) on permanent grassland. Erosion rates decreased to tolerable levels once approximately 30 percent vegetation cover had established and remained low. Under developed ley cover, plot erosion rates were approximately 0.1 to 0.5 t ha-1 yr-1 (mean of 69 plot years 0.21 t ha-1 yr-1). Results suggest erosion rates decrease through time, as the ley cover matures. Soil organic matter content increased consistently and significantly on the set-aside plots (mean of 1.07 percent by weight in 10 years) and soil erodibility significantly decreased. Results suggest using grass-leys for set-aside proves a valuable and viable soil conservation technique, which may contribute to carbon sequestration.
dc.format.extent1311454 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSoil and Water Conservation Society
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jswconline.org/content/61/4/236.abstract?sid=f021493e-535c-4e12-9890-8d39ee4780cd
dc.subjectCarbon sequestration
dc.subjectRunoff plots
dc.subjectSoil erodibility
dc.subjectSoil organic matter
dc.subjectSoil conservation
dc.subjectGrassland
dc.titleLongterm grass ley set aside on sandy soils: a case study
dc.typeJournal article
html.description.abstractInvestigations assessed the potential contribution of grass-ley set-aside to soil conservation. Ten runoff plots (7 to 15o, 12 to 27 percent gradients) at the Hilton Experimental Site, England, were put to ley in 1991, simulating one specific set-aside land-use. Runoff and erosion rates were low, despite potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0.24 percent of precipitation (standard deviation 0.20), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0.13 percent (standard deviation 0.04) on permanent grassland. Erosion rates decreased to tolerable levels once approximately 30 percent vegetation cover had established and remained low. Under developed ley cover, plot erosion rates were approximately 0.1 to 0.5 t ha-1 yr-1 (mean of 69 plot years 0.21 t ha-1 yr-1). Results suggest erosion rates decrease through time, as the ley cover matures. Soil organic matter content increased consistently and significantly on the set-aside plots (mean of 1.07 percent by weight in 10 years) and soil erodibility significantly decreased. Results suggest using grass-leys for set-aside proves a valuable and viable soil conservation technique, which may contribute to carbon sequestration.


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