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dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Colin A.
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-08T14:07:03Z
dc.date.available2007-03-08T14:07:03Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.date.submitted2007-03-07
dc.identifier.citationEarth Surface Processes and Landforms, 31(5): 570-578
dc.identifier.issn01979337
dc.identifier.issn10969837 (online)
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/esp.1348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/9863
dc.descriptionSpecial Issue: The Use of vegetation for erosion control and environmental Protection. Metadata only.
dc.description.abstractErosion plot studies at the Hilton Experimental Site, Shropshire, UK, evaluated the effects of set-aside on runoff, erosion and soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics. Ten runoff plots (slope angles 7-15°) were put to a grass ley in April 1991. Runoff and erosion rates during nine years were low, despite the occurrence of potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0·24 per cent of precipitation (SD = 0·20, n = 89 plot years), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0·13 per cent (SD = 0·04) on permanent (control) grassland. The mean plot erosion rate was 0·21 t ha-1 a-1 (SD = 0·14, n = 69 plot years). Mean SOM content increased consistently and sign fi a tly on the set-aside plots, by a mean value of 1·07 per cent by weight (i.e. 1·07 g per 100 g of soil) in ten ye rs, from 2·04 per cent (1991) to 3·11 per cent (2001). Soil erodibility after six years of set-aside (sampling date 24 April 1997) was determined using a drip-screen rainfall simulator. Soil aggregate stability was higher on the grassed soils, compared with set-aside and bare arable soils. Despite no significant (P > 0·05) differences be w en grassland and set-asid oils, both these treatments were s gnificantly (P < 0·001) diff rent from bare soils. Contrary to the usually strong relationship between SOM and clay content, the percentage silt (r = 0·52, P < 0·001, n = 50) exhibited a stronger correlation with SOM than percentage clay content (r = 0·37, P < 0·01, n = 50). Furthermore, there were equally strong correlations between SOM and cumulative particle size fractions of both clay and silt contents (r = 0·51, P < 0·001, n = 50). In the absence of significant quantities of clay in these sandy soils, silts assist binding of SOM, which has significance for assessing soil carbon sequestration potential. Finally, future SOM and soil organic carbon benchmark work at the Hilton Site will improve harmonization of global SOM databases and enhance international estimates of rates and potential for soil carbon sequestration.
dc.format.extent183847 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112584929/abstract
dc.subjectHilton Experimental Site
dc.subjectRunoff plots
dc.subjectSoil texture
dc.subjectSoil erosion
dc.subjectSoil conservation
dc.subjectRainfall simulator
dc.subjectCarbon sequestration
dc.subjectGrassland
dc.titleGrass ley set-aside and soil organic matter dynamics on sandy soils in Shropshire, UK
dc.title.alternativeShropshire
dc.typeJournal article
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractErosion plot studies at the Hilton Experimental Site, Shropshire, UK, evaluated the effects of set-aside on runoff, erosion and soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics. Ten runoff plots (slope angles 7-15°) were put to a grass ley in April 1991. Runoff and erosion rates during nine years were low, despite the occurrence of potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0·24 per cent of precipitation (SD = 0·20, n = 89 plot years), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0·13 per cent (SD = 0·04) on permanent (control) grassland. The mean plot erosion rate was 0·21 t ha-1 a-1 (SD = 0·14, n = 69 plot years). Mean SOM content increased consistently and sign fi a tly on the set-aside plots, by a mean value of 1·07 per cent by weight (i.e. 1·07 g per 100 g of soil) in ten ye rs, from 2·04 per cent (1991) to 3·11 per cent (2001). Soil erodibility after six years of set-aside (sampling date 24 April 1997) was determined using a drip-screen rainfall simulator. Soil aggregate stability was higher on the grassed soils, compared with set-aside and bare arable soils. Despite no significant (P > 0·05) differences be w en grassland and set-asid oils, both these treatments were s gnificantly (P < 0·001) diff rent from bare soils. Contrary to the usually strong relationship between SOM and clay content, the percentage silt (r = 0·52, P < 0·001, n = 50) exhibited a stronger correlation with SOM than percentage clay content (r = 0·37, P < 0·01, n = 50). Furthermore, there were equally strong correlations between SOM and cumulative particle size fractions of both clay and silt contents (r = 0·51, P < 0·001, n = 50). In the absence of significant quantities of clay in these sandy soils, silts assist binding of SOM, which has significance for assessing soil carbon sequestration potential. Finally, future SOM and soil organic carbon benchmark work at the Hilton Site will improve harmonization of global SOM databases and enhance international estimates of rates and potential for soil carbon sequestration.


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