• Chatting through pictures? A classification of images tweeted in one week in the UK and USA

      Thelwall, Mike; Goriunova, Olga; Vis, Farida; Faulkner, Simon; Burns, Anne; Aulich, Jim; Mas-Bleda, Amalia; Stuart, Emma; D'Orazio, Francesco; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK; Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies; University of Warwick; Gibbet Hill Road Coventry CV4 7AL UK; Information School; University of Sheffield; Regent Court, 211 Portobello Sheffield S1 4DP UK; Manchester School of Art; Manchester Metropolitan University; Cavendish Street Manchester M15 6BR UK; Information School; University of Sheffield; Regent Court, 211 Portobello Sheffield S1 4DP UK; Manchester School of Art; Manchester Metropolitan University; Cavendish Street Manchester M15 6BR UK; Institute of Public Goods and Policies; Spanish National Research Council (CSIC); C/Albasanz 26-28 28037 Madrid Spain; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK; Pulsar; 7 Midford Place London W1T 5BG UK (2016-11)
      Twitter is used by a substantial minority of the populations of many countries to share short messages, sometimes including images. Nevertheless, despite some research into specific images, such as selfies, and a few news stories about specific tweeted photographs, little is known about the types of images that are routinely shared. In response, this article reports a content analysis of random samples of 800 images tweeted from the UK or USA during a week at the end of 2014. Although most images were photographs, a substantial minority were hybrid or layered image forms: phone screenshots, collages, captioned pictures, and pictures of text messages. About half were primarily of one or more people, including 10% that were selfies, but a wide variety of other things were also pictured. Some of the images were for advertising or to share a joke but in most cases the purpose of the tweet seemed to be to share the minutiae of daily lives, performing the function of chat or gossip, sometimes in innovative ways.
    • Peas, Parsnips and Patriotism: Images of the Garden in films of the Second World War

      HOCKENHULL, STELLA (Routeledge, 2016)
      This book examines the ways in which the house appears in films and the modes by which it moves beyond being merely a backdrop for action. Specifically, it explores the ways that domestic spaces carry inherent connotations that filmmakers exploit to enhance meanings and pleasures within film. Rather than simply examining the representation of the house as national symbol, auteur trait, or in terms of genre, contributors study various rooms in the domestic sphere from an assortment of time periods and from a diversity of national cinemas—from interior spaces in ancient Rome to the Chinese kitchen, from the animated house to the metaphor of the armchair in film noir.
    • Experimentation and Post-Heritage in Contemporary TV Drama: Parade’s End

      HOCKENHULL, STELLA (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014)
      At the beginning of Episode Three of Tom Stoppard’s adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s 1920s’ tetralogy, Parade’s End (White 2012), the central character, Christopher Tietjens (Benedict Cumberbatch) lies in hospital wounded, suffering flashbacks to his First World War experiences in the trenches. The sequence commences with an extreme close-up of his bloodied face, before a dissolve introduces a kaleidoscopic and bleached image of his beautiful wife, Sylvia (Rebecca Hall). This shot is immediately followed by that of Tietjens’s lover, Valentine Wannop (Adelaide Clemens), before returning to the more realistic and gruesome events at the hospital. The story chronicles the life of Christopher Tietjens, a wealthy landowner and man of principles, and his promiscuous socialite wife, Sylvia. Tietjens has joined up to fight, but the events which occur in the war form only one layer of the complex plot and backdrop to the love triangle with suffragette, Valentine. The flashback and the optical effect of the kaleidoscope is a repeated motif in the serial, and director, Susanna White, introduces a variety of experimental, surreal and perplexing images throughout this fast moving drama.