Recent Submissions

  • Assessing Customer Service in Airports – Models from the UAE

    Gupta, Aman; Arif, Mohammed; Richardson, Phillip (2014)
  • ‘Lest we forget’: a veteran and son share a ‘warfare tourism’ experience

    Fallon, P., Dr. and Robinson, P.D., Dr. (Taylor & Francis, 2016)
    ‘Warfare tourism’ represents an increasingly significant dimension of contemporary tourism. This paper provides a fresh perspective on participation in ‘warfare tourism’ by investigating the behaviour and experiences of a living veteran and his son returning to two theatres of war in which the veteran had served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War. Active interviews with the two family members were used to gather rich data regarding the two extended trips, which had been funded by ‘Heroes Return’, to Australia in 2012 and Sri Lanka in 2013. The findings indicate that some of the facets of visiting the fallen at other dark tourism sites, such as empathetic identification and personal connection, are also very relevant to trips shared between the living. However, with the living these contribute to a powerful co-created experience in which ‘closer’ bonds between the travellers can be developed. Furthermore, whilst the experiences at times represented ‘bitter-sweet’ nostalgia for the veteran, they also provided the son with the opportunity to ‘look through his father’s eyes’ from both a past and current perspective. Given that there will be war veterans as long as conflicts exist, the results have valuable messages for all those dealing with veterans in the future.
  • BIBLIOMETRIC STUDIES IN TOURISM

    Rahimi, Roya; Koseoglu, Mehmet Ali; Okumus, Fevzi; Liu, Jingyan (Elsevier, 2016-11-2)
    This study evaluates bibliometric studies in tourism, depicts emerging themes, and offers critical discussions for theory development and future research. To achieve this aim, 190 papers with bibliometric analyses from leading hospitality and tourism journals were selected and critically analyzed. The research findings reveal that bibliometric articles published in these journals significantly increased after 2008. However, systematic review studies emerged as the major group, and relatively few studies utilized evaluative bibliometric and relational bibliometric studies. Study results suggest that paucity still exists, particularly in relational bibliometric studies in tourism. This is one of the first studies in this area that offers critical discussions and suggestions related to theory development and future research in this research vein.
  • The effects of online social networking on retail consumer dynamics in the attractions industry: The case of ‘E-da’ theme park, Taiwan

    Stylos, Nikolaos; Fotiadis, A. K. (Elsevier, 2016-07)
    Purpose of this study is to examine the trends in retail consumers’ consumption dynamics and patterns of purchase behavior within this new-technology-mediated environment. A behavioral purchase model was developed and tested to understand the ways social networks influence the decision making of individuals planning to visit a theme park. In particular, the proposed model delineates how online social networking (OSN) experience factors affect actual use (AU) of social media for purchasing of theme park services through an assessment of perceived usefulness (PU) and perceived ease of use (PEOU). An electronic survey was conducted with members of a theme park’s brand fan page on the Facebook social media site namely, the E-da World Theme park in the southern Taiwanese city of Kaohsiung. Smart PLS 3, a partial least squares analysis, was employed to examine a series of eleven research hypotheses. The findings revealed a series of statistically significant influences from five exogenous variables on PU and PEOU, as well as the mediating role of PU on the PEOU – AU relationship. The results also provide important practical implications both for academics and practitioners by shedding light on the way social media works to encourage and support online purchasing of amusement services.”
  • Exergetic life cycle assessment of a grid-connected, polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic system

    Koroneos, Christopher; Stylos, Nikolaos (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2014-05-25)
    Purpose Nowadays, the intensive use of natural resources in order to satisfy the increasing energy demand suggests a threat to the implementation of the principles of sustainable development. The present study attempts to approach thermodynamically the depletion of natural resources in the methodological framework and the principles of life cycle assessment (LCA). Methods An environmental decision support tool is studied, the exergetic life cycle assessment (ELCA). It arises from the convergence of the LCA and exergy analysis (EA) methodologies and attempts to identify the exergetic parameters that are related to the life cycle of the examined system or process. The ELCA methodology, beside the fact that it locates the system parts which involve greater exergy losses, examines the depletion of natural resources (biotic and abiotic) and the sustainable prospective of the examined system or process, under the scope of exergy. In order to obtain concrete results, the ELCA methodology is applied to a large-scale, grid-connected, photovoltaic (PV) system with energy storage that is designed to entirely electrify the Greek island of Nisyros. Results and discussion Four discerned cases were studied that reflect the present state and the future development of the PV technology. The exergy flows and balance for the life cycle of the PV system, as they were formed in the ELCA study, showed that the incoming exergy (solar radiation, energy sources, and materials) is not efficiently utilized. The greater exergy losses appear at the stage of the operation of the PV installation. Due to the fact that contribution of the renewable exergy (solar radiation) to the formation of the total incoming exergy of Life Cycle is significant, it emerges that satisfaction of electric power needs with a PV system appears to be exergetic sustainable. The increase of the Life Cycle exergetic efficiency supported by the future technological scenario in contrast to present scenarios emerges from the increased electricity output of the PV system. Consequently, the increased exergetic efficiency involves decreased irreversibility (exergy losses) of the PV system’s life cycle. Conclusions The application of ELCA in electricity production technologies exceeds the proven sustainable prospective of the PV systems; however, it aims to show the essence of the application of ELCA methodology in the environmental decision making process. ELCA can be a useful tool for the support and formation of the environmental decision making that can illustrate in terms of exergetic sustainability the examined energy system or process.
  • How do Motivation, Pre-Visit Information Search and Destination Image affect Post-Visit Behavioural Intention? The case of an island destination.

    Li-Hui Chang; Stylos, Nikolaos; Shih-Shuo Yeh; Yu-Yun Tung (International University College, 2015)
    The purpose of this study is to examine tourists' pre and post visit behaviours in Kinmen and the change of their perceived destination image about the place. Questionnaire interview was used to survey international tourists to Kinmen, Taiwan. The relevant survey was based on a selfadministered questionnaire that finally generated 563 responses out of initially 610 questionnaires that were distributed. Thus, the return rate was 94%. The results indicate that pre-visit behaviour (comprised of motives, information search, and destination image) can influence post-visit behavioural intention directly and through decision making. Decision making also possess direct impact on post-visit behavioural intention, but has no mediating effect. The study has also indicated that certain socio-demographic variables possess significant influence on tourists' pre-visit behaviours. Firstly, young and non-married respondents with less monthly salary are more likely to visit Kinmen for learning motives. Secondly, education level is the strongest predictor for tourists' information search behaviours. Finally, socio-demographic variables possess little impact on destination image.
  • Differences in Sustainable Management Between Four- and Five-Star Hotels Regarding the Perceptions of Three-Pillar Sustainability

    Stylos, Nikolaos; Vassiliadis, Chris (Taylor & Francis, 2015-02-19)
    Although there are a wealth of publications about sustainability in tourism destination management literature, the concept has only recently started coming under examination within the area of hospitality management. This article’s main focus is on capturing the perceptions and practices of hotel management in respect to the concept of three-dimensional sustainability. A literature-based self-administered questionnaire was used and 423 hotels participated in the study. Logistic regression was employed in order to examine four research hypotheses and extract useful findings. The findings suggest that hotel star ratings play a significant role in the perceived importance of financial measures of economic viability, as well as in the application of socially responsible practices by hotel management; the same conclusion does not apply to environmental practices. Furthermore, it was found that hotel location does not play a significant role in shaping perceptions of sustainability dimensions.
  • The foundation degree in travel operations management – a reflective perspective

    Robinson, Peter (2008)
    In September 2007 60 students from TUI, the UKs largest tour operator, enrolled on an innovative new Foundation Degree in Travel Operations Management, delivered online by University of Wolverhampton, University College Birmingham and Coventry University. The FD was developed as part of University of Wolverhampton’s response to the Governments drive for ‘new, innovative awards at sub‐degree level’ launched in 2000. It is managed through the Department for Leisure and Lifestyle Industries Management (LALIM) as the lead partner in the group of HEIs, working under the umbrella of UKTEP, the UK Travel Education Partnership. A project steering group involving staff from each HEI, the employer and Foundation Degree Forward, monitors the programme. The long‐term aim is for the programme to become the National Standard for the Travel Industry and the first 60 students are the pilot for this programme. Eight months on this article reflects on the progress of the students and considers some of the challenges for the future.
  • The Case for community-led tourism development: engaging & supporting entrepreneurial communities

    Robinson, Peter (2008)
    This paper critically assesses a case study approach to community-led tourism development based upon reflective observational research carried out by the author between 2004-2006. The paper establishes the ad-hoc nature of stakeholder and volunteer led development projects and identifies a lack of available resources in either academic or practical fields to support individuals and groups involved in these projects. Often these are good examples of community entrepreneurship or are a reaction to the often-missed opportunity to encourage tourist spend. Projects discussed in the paper include interpretation, product development and community enterprise initiatives. The research is underpinned by observational and experiential reviews of work delivered through innovative methodologies to inform community consultation and subsequently supported by the development of strategies that lend a clear vision to the community aim. These developments often have considerable potential to make a significant impact on local economies and community socio-economics and strengthen public sector relationships through strategic clarity. Often they only come about through professional input at a regional level and are still delivered through a top-down approach, even though their altruistic vision and successful community engagement is bottom-up in ideology. Further research identifies a similar trend in Asia and Africa where community led tourism projects are considered a key catalyst for economic regeneration. In all the cases discussed there is a clear lack of accessible information and it is the overall aim of this paper to highlight a greater need to reflect upon existing case studies, to address the theoretical perspectives of sustainable development in this context, and to create a toolkit for potential sustainable communities.
  • An innovative delivery of foundation degrees; but not without its problems!

    Robinson, Peter; Wiscombe, Caroline (2008)
    After three years of development in partnership with two other HEI's, employers and related organisations the University of Wolverhampton launched its Foundation Degree in Travel Operations Management in September 2008. The course was designed to be a pilot for a national programme and the institution is now leading the Curriculum Development element of the national product, in partnership with FDF. This workshop explores the journey so far and the trials and tribulations of developing a work based Foundation Degree in association with two other HEI’s, employers and related organisations. It is delivered on-line using Pebble Pad technology and supported by a face to face induction with ongoing email and telephone tutorials. The first cohort of 60 students is nearing the end of the first year of the programme, and the process has highlighted a number of difficulties including resources in planning and developing on line learning materials (both the materials themselves, the costs of technical expertise and ongoing Technology Supported Learning (TSL) training). In addition agreeing the programme regulations (including the size of modules); agreements in financial arrangements between employers and the HEI partners (each of which have different rates of pricing for FD); preparing industry personnel for their mentoring and coaching roles and changing personnel in supporting organisations contributed to the issues. Finally ensuring compliance with sector skills organisations who have not yet written their FD frameworks; industry partners frustration in timely decision making processes through the complicated list of personnel involved in agreeing decisions at different strategic levels of the university structures contribute to periods of frustration. By sharing these experiences and the current experience of being involved in the development of a wider partnership the authors hope to prevent future problems that may arise in innovative developments and to share the good practice that the programme has so far established, and which will from September 2008, be delivered using a broader national model.
  • An innovative delivery of foundation degrees; but not without its problems!

    Wiscombe, Caroline; Robinson, Peter; Wale, Debra (2007)
    This observational study explores the trials and tribulations of developing a work based Foundation Degree (FD) in Travel Operations Management in association with two other HEI’s, employers and related organisations. It is delivered on-line using Pebble Pad technology and supported by a face to face induction with ongoing email and telephone tutorials. Whilst a first cohort of 60 students is now enrolled and progressing with their first modules, it has not been an easy two year developmental journey. The process has highlighted a number of difficulties including resources in planning and developing on line learning materials (both the materials themselves, the costs of technical expertise and ongoing Technology Supported Learning (TSL) training). In addition agreeing the programme regulations (including the size of modules); agreements in financial arrangements between employers and the HEI partners (each of which have different rates of pricing for FD); preparing industry personnel for their mentoring and coaching roles and changing personnel in supporting organisations contributed to the issues. Finally ensuring compliance with sector skills organisations who have not yet written their FD frameworks; industry partners frustration in timely decision making processes through the complicated list of personnel involved in agreeing decisions at different strategic levels of the university structures contribute to periods of frustration. By sharing these experiences the authors hope to prevent future problems that may arise in innovative developments.