Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBoyda, David
dc.contributor.advisorMcfeeters, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorHitchens, Danielle
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-10T11:44:03Z
dc.date.available2022-01-10T11:44:03Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/624537
dc.descriptionA portfolio submitted to The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate: Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psych.en
dc.description.abstractObjective: The current study aimed to examine if specific emotion regulation facets mediated the relationship between different stressful life events and deliberate self-harm. It examined both the cumulative and specific effects of stressful life events. Methods: A quantitative correlational survey method was adopted using several questionnaires to explore the relationship between stressful life events, emotion dysregulation and self-harm engagement. The sample included 164 individuals who were seeking support from a secondary care NHS service. Analysis was conducted using Mplus 6 and involved two mediation models. Results: The results demonstrated that different types of stressful life events were significantly associated with engagement in deliberate self-harm. This varied depending on the stressful life event, in which some stressful life events decreased self-harm engagement. In isolation the number of stressful life events was not significantly associated with self-harm, indicating that there was no cumulative effect of stressful life events on engagement in deliberate self-harm. However, experiencing more stressful life events was significantly associated with deliberate self-harm through specific emotion regulation facets. Conclusions: Results indicated that stressful life events are more likely to contribute to the engagement in deliberate self-harm when they coexist. The current findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the mediating processes between stressful life events and deliberate self-harm. They specifically demonstrate that particular pathways to deliberate self-harm are not determined by the presence of stressful life events, but the ways in which emotion regulation ability is refined and developed during their presence, which subsequently effects the individuals need to use deliberate self-harm as a means of managing their distress.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectstressful life eventsen
dc.subjectcumulative stressen
dc.subjectemotion regulationen
dc.subjectemotion dysregulationen
dc.subjectself-harmen
dc.subjectdeliberate self-harmen
dc.subjecttraumaen
dc.subjectaffect regulationen
dc.subjectself-injuryen
dc.subjectdistressen
dc.titleStressful life events and deliberate self-harm: Exploring the specificity of stressful life events and emotion regulation facetsen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Human Sciences, Faculty of Education, Health and Wellbeing
dc.type.qualificationnamePractitioner Doctorate
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
refterms.dateFOA2022-01-10T11:44:03Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Hitchens_Pract_Doc_thesis_Reda ...
Size:
3.128Mb
Format:
PDF
Thumbnail
Name:
Hitchens_Pract_Doc_Thesis.pdf
Embargo:
2122-12-31
Size:
3.229Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International