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dc.contributor.authorDayson, Chris
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Ellen
dc.contributor.authorDamm, Chris
dc.contributor.authorRees, James
dc.contributor.authorJacklin-Jarvis, Carol
dc.contributor.authorPatmore, Beth
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Leila
dc.contributor.authorTerry, Vita
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Katie
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-25T10:33:02Z
dc.date.available2021-11-25T10:33:02Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationDayson, C., Bennett, E., Damm, C., Rees, J., Jacklin Jarvis, C., Patmore, B., Baker, L., Terry, V. and Turner, K. (in press) The distinctiveness of smaller voluntary organisations providing welfare services. Journal of Social Policy.en
dc.identifier.issn0047-2794en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/624456
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Cambridge University Press in Journal of Social Policy (in press). The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractThis article presents empirical findings about the distinctiveness of smaller voluntary sector organisations (VSOs) involved in welfare service provision, based on in-depth, qualitative case study research. We identify a series of organisational features and practices which can mean that smaller VSOs are distinctive from larger organisations. These include how they are governed and managed, their approach to their work, and their position relative to other providers. To explain our findings, we draw on the concept of stakeholder ambiguity. This idea was posited by Billis and Glennerster (1998) and is commonly cited in relation to distinctiveness. We identified several manifestations of stakeholder ambiguity and confirm the concept’s explanatory importance, although we argue that our understanding of distinctiveness is enhanced when stakeholder ambiguity is considered alongside other closely related features, such as being embedded in a local geographic community and informal, familial care-based organisational cultures. Our findings also highlight the fragility of smaller VSOs. We argue that this combination of distinctiveness and fragility creates a tension for social policy makers, many of whom recognise the value of smaller VSOs and the risks that they face but must weigh this against a requirement to allocate resources for statutory services as effectively as possible.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research underpinning this article was funded through a grant from the Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-social-policyen
dc.subjectvoluntary sectoren
dc.subjectwelfare servicesen
dc.subjectstakeholder ambiguityen
dc.subjectdistinctivenessen
dc.titleThe distinctiveness of smaller voluntary organisations providing welfare servicesen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Social Policyen
dc.date.updated2021-11-24T22:56:56Z
dc.date.accepted2021-11-22
rioxxterms.funderLloyds Bank Foundation of England and Walesen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW25112021JRen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-11-25en
refterms.dateFCD2021-11-25T10:32:38Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-25T10:33:03Z


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