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dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Michael
dc.contributor.authorAbdullah, Abrizah
dc.contributor.authorFairclough, Ruth
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-19T11:36:19Z
dc.date.available2021-11-19T11:36:19Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-27
dc.identifier.citationThelwall, M., Abdullah, A. and Fairclough, R. (2022) Researching women and men 1996-2020: Is androcentrism still dominant? Quantitative Science Studies, 1-21.en
dc.identifier.issn2641-3337en
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/qss_a_00173
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/624449
dc.description© 2021 The Authors. Published by MIT Press. This is an open access article available under a Creative Commons licence. The published version can be accessed at the following link on the publisher’s website: https://doi.org/10.1162/qss_a_00173en
dc.description.abstractThis article assesses the balance of research concerning women and men over the past quarter century using the crude heuristic of counting Scopus-indexed journal articles relating to women or men, as suggested by their titles or abstracts. A manual checking procedure together with a word-based heuristic was used to identify whether an article related to women or men. The heuristic includes both explicit mentions of women and men, implicit mentions, and a set of gender-focused health issues and medical terminology. Based on the results, more published articles now relate to women than to men. Moreover, more than twice as many articles relate exclusively to women than exclusively to men, with the ratio increasing from 2.16 to 1 in 1996 to 2.25 to 1 in 2020. Monogender articles mostly addressed primarily female health issues (maternity, breast cancer, cervical cancer) with fewer about primarily male health issues (testicular cancer, pancreatic cancer, health needs of men who have sex with men). Some articles also explicitly addressed gender inequality, such as empowering women entrepreneurs. The findings suggests that the androcentrism of early science has eroded in terms of research topics. This apparent progress should be encouraging for women researchers and society.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMIT Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://direct.mit.edu/qss/article/doi/10.1162/qss_a_00173/108658/Researching-women-and-men-1996-2020-Isen
dc.subjectscientometricsen
dc.subjectandrocentrismen
dc.subjectfeminist critique of scienceen
dc.titleResearching women and men 1996-2020: Is androcentrism still dominant?en
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalQuantitative Science Studiesen
dc.date.updated2021-11-19T08:48:27Z
dc.date.accepted2021-11-18
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW19112021MTen
rioxxterms.versionProofen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-12-06en
dc.source.volume2021
dc.source.beginpage1
refterms.dateFCD2021-11-19T11:35:50Z
refterms.versionFCDProof
refterms.dateFOA2021-12-17T00:00:00Z


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