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dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, Roger
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-16T10:47:23Z
dc.date.available2021-07-16T10:47:23Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-12
dc.identifier.citationWang, W., Seifert, R. (2021) The end of meaningful work in the not-for-profit sector? A case study of ethics in employee relations under the new business-like operation regime. Journal of Business Ethics (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04891-4en
dc.identifier.issn0167-4544en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10551-021-04891-4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/624200
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Springer in Journal of Business Ethics on 12/07/2021, available online: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-021-04891-4 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractDeveloped from meaningful work and business ethics, we investigate the motivational effect of meaningful work on paid staff (not volunteers) with a “shortage” of ethical employment practices situated in the Not-for-Profit sector. We tested the traditional notion of meaningful work by nature and by line manager support (under its business-like practices) to compensate for the “sacrifice” (low pay and job stress caused by poor employment terms) of front line staff working alongside professional managers paid the market rate. Using a mixed-method case study, we employed SEM modelling to analyse a staff survey of 125 valid responses and administrative records of staff resignation, alongside interviews. The results show that meaningful work by nature and by line manager support are positively and significantly associated with job satisfaction but neither has a significant effect on staff resignation action. There is no empirical evidence to support the compensating effect of meaningful work by nature; meaningful work by line manager support has a stronger effect only through reduced job stress, rather than compensating for the low pay, in preventing resignation. The qualitative analysis reveals that continued low pay and using precarious employment contracts have evoked the questioning of ethics of employment practices in this sector. We discuss the implications and suggest further areas of research.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10551-021-04891-4en
dc.subjectmeaningful worken
dc.subjectjob stressen
dc.subjectstaff turnover behaviouren
dc.subjectcharitiesen
dc.subjectperceived fair payen
dc.titleThe end of meaningful work in charities? A case study of ethics in employee relationsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Business Ethicsen
dc.date.updated2021-07-11T18:44:37Z
dc.date.accepted2021-07-02
rioxxterms.fundernonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW16072021WWen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-07-12en
refterms.dateFCD2021-07-16T10:46:45Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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