Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mike
dc.contributor.authorKousha, Kayvan
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-07T10:33:05Z
dc.date.available2021-04-07T10:33:05Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-31
dc.identifier.citationThelwall, M. and Kousha, K. (in press) Researchers’ attitudes towards the h-index on Twitter 2007–2020: criticism and acceptance. Scientometrics.en
dc.identifier.issn0138-9130en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11192-021-03961-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/624013
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Springer in Scientometrics (in press). The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractThe h-index is a well-known indicator of the scientific impact of an academic publishing career. Its hybrid publishing/citation nature and inherent bias against younger researchers, women, people in low resourced countries, and those not prioritizing publishing arguably give it little value for most formal and informal research evaluations. Nevertheless, it is well-known by academics, used in some promotion decisions, and is prominent in bibliometric databases, such as Google Scholar. In the context of this apparent conflict, it is important to understand researchers’ attitudes towards the h-index. This article used public tweets in English to analyse how scholars discuss the h-index in public: is it mentioned, are tweets about it positive or negative, and has interest decreased since its shortcomings were exposed. The January 2021 Twitter Academic Research initiative was harnessed to download all English tweets mentioning the h-index from the 2006 start of Twitter until the end of 2020. The results showed a constantly increasing number of tweets. Whilst the most popular tweets unapologetically used the h-index as an indicator of research performance, 28.5% of tweets were critical of its simplistic nature and others joked about it (8%). The results suggest that interest in the h-index is still increasing online despite scientists willing to evaluate the h-index in public tending to be critical. Despite this, in limited situations it may be effective at succinctly conveying the message that a researcher has had a successful publishing career.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.springer.com/journal/11192en
dc.subjectH-indexen
dc.subjecttwitteren
dc.subjectSocial Mediaen
dc.subjectTwitter Academic APIen
dc.subjectResearch evaluationen
dc.subjectscientometricsen
dc.titleResearchers’ attitudes towards the h-index on Twitter 2007–2020: criticism and acceptanceen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalScientometricsen
dc.date.updated2021-04-03T18:18:40Z
dc.date.accepted2021-04-03
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW07042021MTen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-12-31en
refterms.dateFCD2021-04-07T10:32:36Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Thelwall_Kousha_Researchers_at ...
Embargo:
2022-12-31
Size:
337.9Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/