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dc.contributor.authorDevonport, Tracey
dc.contributor.authorKent, Sofie
dc.contributor.authorLane, Andy
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-05T10:37:05Z
dc.date.available2021-01-05T10:37:05Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-25
dc.identifier.citationDevonport, T. et al. (2021) Implementing a pressure training program to improve decision-making and execution of skill among premier league academy soccer players, Journal of Applied Sport Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1080/10413200.2020.1868618en
dc.identifier.issn1041-3200en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10413200.2020.1868618
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623852
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/10413200.2020.1868618 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractThe present study evaluated the effectiveness of an intervention intended to improve academy players’ performance under pressure. Male academy soccer players (n = 82; mean age = 14.12 years, SD = 2.28) completed a baseline pressure task producing performance scores (A) for decision making and skill execution. By completing a pressure task, players received pressure training (PT) (Wood & Wilson, 2012). Players were then randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 41; receiving PT, three cognitive behavior workshops, and reflective diaries) or comparison group (n = 41; receiving PT only). Sixty-eight players (n = 29; intervention group; n = 39; comparison group) repeated the PT task at a six-week follow up (B), and of these, 26 (n = 15; intervention group; n = 11; PT only) also completed a re-test PT task (A) at 12-week follow up. Due to attrition at follow up, chi-square analysis was conducted across experimental groups A-B only. Analysis indicated intervention players scored significantly higher in their decision-making (p = .028) with a significant main effect of age-group on decision-making (p = .003) and skill execution (p = .005). Four players (highest scoring and lowest scoring player within intervention and comparison groups) from each academy age-group (n = 16) took part in individual interviews to explore intervention effectiveness. Thematic analysis found that some players perceived no benefits of the condition they completed, others perceived benefits to confidence, meta-cognitive skills, and challenge appraisals. Methodological implications for future pressure training interventions are presented.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10413200.2020.1868618?journalCode=uasp20en
dc.subjectmental-toughnessen
dc.subjectperformance interventionen
dc.subjectcopingen
dc.subjectresilienceen
dc.titleImplementing a pressure training program to improve decision-making and execution of skill among premier league academy soccer playersen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Sport Psychologyen
dc.date.updated2021-01-04T10:05:20Z
dc.date.accepted2020-12-20
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW05012021TDen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-02-25en
refterms.dateFCD2021-01-05T10:34:40Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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