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dc.contributor.authorStone, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorKöhring, Jenny
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-18T15:19:18Z
dc.date.available2020-12-18T15:19:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-11
dc.identifier.citationStone, C. and Köhring, J. (2021) Sensory ecologies and semiotic assemblages during British Sign Language interpreted weather forecasts, International Journal of Multilingualism, 18(2), pp. 226-243, DOI: 10.1080/14790718.2020.1867149.en
dc.identifier.issn1479-0718en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14790718.2020.1867149en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623845
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in International Journal of Multilingualism on 11/01/2021, available online at: https://doi.org/10.1080/14790718.2020.1867149 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractWe present a study examining broadcast British Sign Language (BSL) interpreted weather forecasts. These are filmed against a green screen with a superimposed composite image broadcast including maps and satellite information, etc. that can be indexed. We examine the semiotic resources used when interacting with the available visible on-screen information to the viewing audiences. The forecasters and interpreters tailor their multimodal communicative practice to the sensory ecology (Kusters, 2017) of the audiences they serve. That is to say that, speakers/hearers hear the spoken monolingual linguistic resources while seeing the gestural resources of the forecaster ; BSL signers/watchers view the multilingual linguistic resources (both categorical and gradient) and co-sign gestural resources, subsequently watching the gestural resources of the forecaster and the interpreter -presenter. We identify that while similar gestural resources are used by the weather presenters and the in-vision interpreter-presenters, the temporal alignment of the semiotic assemblages (Pennycook & Otsuji, 2017) of linguistic and gestural resources are different. The assumed normative practices of the deaf audience appear to significantly contribute to the consecutive use of semiotic resources that we see presented in BSL by in-vision interpreter-presenters. In addition to simultaneous assemblages, favoured by the weather forecaster presenters, they also create consecutive semiotic assemblages.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14790718.2020.1867149
dc.subjectmultimodalityen
dc.subjecttemporal alignmenten
dc.subjectgestureen
dc.subjectin-vision interpretingen
dc.titleSensory ecologies and semiotic assemblages during British Sign Language interpreted weather forecastsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Multilingualismen
dc.date.updated2020-12-18T12:49:02Z
dc.date.accepted2020-12-16
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW18122020CSen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2022-07-11en
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage226
dc.source.endpage243
refterms.dateFCD2020-12-18T15:18:46Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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