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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jean
dc.contributor.authorVamplew, Wray
dc.contributor.editorRiess, Steven
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-20T10:50:46Z
dc.date.available2020-08-20T10:50:46Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-28
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, J. and Vamplew, W. (2021) Products, training, and technology, in Reiss, S. (ed.) A Cultural History of Sport, Volume 6: A Cultural History of Sport in the Modern Age. London: Bloomsbury.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781350024106en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623505
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of a book chapter published by Bloomsbury in A Cultural History of Sport: Volume 6: A Cultural History of Sport in the Modern Age on 28/01/2021. The published version can be accessed here: https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/a-cultural-history-of-sport-9781350024106/ The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractSports products can be divided into three major categories. First, spectator products, which are sold either at the sites of events or mediated electronically and made globally available by satellite technology. Secondly, player products which may include games, equipment and costume, instruction and assistance, facilities, clubs, and training. Thirdly, associated products which are goods and services which have been allied with sport in some way, but which are not really necessary to the playing or watching of sport, though they can heighten the enjoyment (Vamplew 2018). These might include a varied range of products which stand alone, but are integral to experiential enjoyment, such as music, food and drink, social media, mainstream media, merchandise, and different spectator experiences (including VIP boxes and special areas with enhanced hospitality) and so forth. As will be shown below, technology had a significant role in developments within all these categories All sports products can be affected also by cultural values through the beliefs, attitudes, and emotions of both producers and consumers. While income, wealth, and prices clearly have a major role in the marketing of sport, as with any other visitor attraction experience, culture also influences the taste demand. Tastes can vary across individuals who maybe like to experience “value for money” or a “grand day out” and are also affected by class, gender, and nationality. Tastes can also be influenced by opinion-makers including entrepreneurs and commercial advertisers, or dictated by law, as the “safe standing” movement in Britain at association football grounds indicates. This chapter, though far from comprehensive, explores some of these cultural issues in an introductory overview.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBloomsburyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe Cultural Histories Seriesen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/a-cultural-history-of-sport-9781350024106/en
dc.subjectproductsen
dc.subjectspectatoren
dc.subjectsports clubsen
dc.subjecttraining aidsen
dc.subjectclothingen
dc.subjecttechnologyen
dc.titleProducts, training, and technologyen
dc.typeChapter in booken
dc.date.updated2020-08-04T15:11:00Z
pubs.editionFirst edition
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW20082020JWen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-07-28en
dc.source.booktitleA Cultural History of Sport in the Modern Age
refterms.dateFCD2020-08-20T10:37:20Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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