Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorXu, Man
dc.contributor.authorLao, Jiaqiang
dc.contributor.authorYin, Ping
dc.contributor.authorHou, Jiang
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yun
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jiao
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Bing
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ruoling
dc.contributor.authorKe, Li
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hongying
dc.contributor.authorHu, Ping
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T15:06:35Z
dc.date.available2020-07-31T15:06:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-12
dc.identifier.citationXu, M., Liao, J., Yin, P., Hou, J. et al (2019) Association of air pollution with the risk of initial outpatient visits for tuberculosis in Wuhan, China, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 76(8), pp.560-566.en
dc.identifier.issn1351-0711en
dc.identifier.pmid31300562 (pubmed)
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/oemed-2018-105532en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623408
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by BMJ Publishing Group in Occupational and Environmental Medicine on 12//07/2019, available online: https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2018-105532 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstract© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. Objectives Previous studies suggested the association of air pollution with initial Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and the disease development. However, few studies have been conducted on air pollution and initial tuberculosis (TB) consults using short-interval data. We investigated the weekly association between air pollution and initial TB outpatient visits. Methods We used a Poisson regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model to conduct a time-series study with weekly air pollution data and TB cases during 2014-2017 in Wuhan, China. Results A 10 μg/m 3 increase in NO 2 (nitrogen dioxide) was associated with 11.74% (95% CI: 0.70 to 23.98, lag 0-1 weeks), 21.45% (95% CI: 1.44 to 45.41, lag 0-2 weeks) and 12.8% (95% CI: 0.97 to 26.02, lag 0-1 weeks) increase in initial TB consults among all patients with TB, old patients (≥60 years old) and male ones, respectively. A 10 μg/m 3 increase in SO 2 (sulfur dioxide) was associated with -22.23% (95% CI: -39.23 to -0.49, lag 0-16 weeks), -28.65% (95% CI: -44.3 to -8.58, lag 0-16 weeks), -23.85 (95% CI: -41.79 to -0.37, lag 0-8 weeks) and -23.82% (95% CI: -41.31 to -1.11, lag 0-16 weeks) increase in initial TB consults among the total, young (aged 15-59 years old), old and male patients, respectively. In old patients, a 0.1 mg/m 3 increase in CO (carbon monoxide) and a 10 μg/m 3 increase in PM 2.5 (particulate matter) were separately associated with 42.32% (95% CI: 1.16 to 100.22, lag 0-16 weeks) and 17.38% (95% CI: 0.28 to 37.38, lag 0-16 weeks) increases in TB consults. Conclusion Our study first highlighted the importance of weekly association between air pollution and the risk of initial TB consults, which is helpful for the arrangements of TB screening and medical assistance.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.urlhttps://oem.bmj.com/content/76/8/560en
dc.subjectair pollutionen
dc.subjectinitial outpatient visitsen
dc.subjecttuberculosisen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution
dc.subject.meshCarbon Monoxide
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshChina
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNitrogen Dioxide
dc.subject.meshOutpatients
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter
dc.subject.meshSulfur Dioxide
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis, Pulmonary
dc.titleAssociation of air pollution with the risk of initial outpatient visits for tuberculosis in Wuhan, Chinaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn1470-7926
dc.identifier.journalOccupational and Environmental Medicineen
dc.date.updated2020-07-10T10:34:16Z
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
pubs.place-of-publicationEngland
dc.date.accepted2019-06-12
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW31072020RCen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-31en
dc.source.volume76
dc.source.issue8
dc.source.beginpage560
dc.source.endpage566
dc.description.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFCD2020-07-31T15:03:19Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2019-07-31T00:00:00Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Chen_Association_Air_Pollution ...
Size:
4.341Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/