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dc.contributor.authorPatel, Mitesh
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, R. E.
dc.contributor.authorRiyaz, Mohammed U.
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Maroof
dc.contributor.authorBuckwell, David
dc.contributor.authorBunday, Karen
dc.contributor.authorAhmad, Hena
dc.contributor.authorKaski, Diego
dc.contributor.authorArshad, Qadeer
dc.contributor.authorBronstein, Adolfo M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-08T14:27:38Z
dc.date.available2020-07-08T14:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-04
dc.identifier.citationPatel, M., Roberts, R.E., Riyaz, M.U. et al. (2015) Locomotor adaptation is modulated by observing the actions of others, Journal of Neurophysiology, 114(3), pp. 1538-1544.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-3077en
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/jn.00446.2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623333
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by American Physiological Society in Journal of Neurophysiology on 04/09/2015, available online: https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00446.2015 The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractObserving the motor actions of another person could facilitate compensatory motor behavior in the passive observer. Here we explored whether action observation alone can induce automatic locomotor adaptation in humans. To explore this possibility, we used the "broken escalator" paradigm. Conventionally this involves stepping upon a stationary sled after having previously experienced it actually moving (Moving trials). This history of motion produces a locomotor aftereffect when subsequently stepping onto a stationary sled. We found that viewing an actor perform the Moving trials was sufficient to generate a locomotor aftereffect in the observer, the size of which was significantly correlated with the size of the movement (postural sway) observed. Crucially, the effect is specific to watching the task being performed, as no motor adaptation occurs after simply viewing the sled move in isolation. These findings demonstrate that locomotor adaptation in humans can be driven purely by action observation, with the brain adapting motor plans in response to the size of the observed individual's motion. This mechanism may be mediated by a mirror neuron system that automatically adapts behavior to minimize movement errors and improve motor skills through social cues, although further neurophysiological studies are required to support this theory. These data suggest that merely observing the gait of another person in a challenging environment is sufficient to generate appropriate postural countermeasures, implying the existence of an automatic mechanism for adapting locomotor behavior.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MR/J004685/1) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Imperial Biomedical Research Centre.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/jn.00446.2015en
dc.subjectlocomotionen
dc.subjectadaptationen
dc.subjectlearningen
dc.subjectaction observationen
dc.subjectmirror neuronsen
dc.titleLocomotor adaptation is modulated by observing the actions of othersen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Neurophysiologyen
dc.date.accepted2015-07-06
rioxxterms.funderUK Medical Research Council and the National Institute for Health Researchen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectMR/J004685/1en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-07-08en
dc.source.volume114
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage1538
dc.source.endpage1544
refterms.dateFCD2020-07-08T14:26:29Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-08T14:27:39Z


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