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dc.contributor.authorJandric, Petar
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-18T15:00:10Z
dc.date.available2020-06-18T15:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-22
dc.identifier.citationJandric, P. and Hayes, S. (2020) Writing the history of the present, Postdigital Science and Education, 2, pp. 1062–1068.en
dc.identifier.issn2524-4868en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s42438-020-00168-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623273
dc.descriptionThis is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Springer in Postdigital Science and Education on 22/07/2020. The accepted version of the publication may differ from the final published version.en
dc.description.abstractTeaching in The Age of Covid-19 ‘Teaching in The Age of Covid-19’ (Jandrić et al. 2020) presents 80 textual testimonies and 79 home workspace photographs submitted by 83 authors from 19 countries. Collected between 18 March and 5 May 2020, the testimonies and photographs describe uncanny feelings, daily experiences and challenges, and emergency solutions, developed by worldwide academics at the very beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic. Supplemented with one editor’s introduction at the beginning, and another editor’s reflections at the end, these messy and unpredictable texts and images have now obtained the form of a ‘proper’ piece of academic writing. Yet appearance deceives; as we found out early into the project, this collection can be read in many different ways. At a time when local and global surveys are contributing insights on how the move to online learning and teaching is being experienced (Watermeyer et al. 2020), we explain why this particular collection is both different, but also complementary, to other studies. Each contribution to ‘Teaching in The Age of Covid-19’ (Jandrić et al. 2020) is a standalone authored work, that is both distinct and diverse. Some texts and images are small artistic masterpieces; others more focused to the ‘scientific’ side of things; and many contributions, neither particularly artistic nor very scholarly, provide a wealth of insights into the everyday life and practice of teachers and students during the very beginning of lockdown. We have a lot of appreciation for great arts, and new ideas are the bread and butter of academic inquiry. Yet ‘Teaching in The Age of Covid-19’ is not primarily about beautiful storytelling and / or novel ideas.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.springer.com/journal/42438/en
dc.subjectCOVID-19en
dc.subjecttestimoniesen
dc.titleWriting the history of the presenten
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalPostdigital Science and Educationen
dc.date.updated2020-06-16T14:43:33Z
dc.date.accepted2020-06-16
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW18062020SHen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-06-16en
dc.citation.volume2
dc.citation.epage1068
dc.citation.spage1062
dc.source.volume2
dc.source.beginpage1062
dc.source.endpage1068
refterms.dateFCD2020-06-18T14:57:29Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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