Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNicklin, Laura
dc.contributor.authorSwain, Emma
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Joanne
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-18T14:37:01Z
dc.date.available2020-06-18T14:37:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-16
dc.identifier.citationNicklin, L.L., Swain, E. and Lloyd, J. (2020) Reactions to unsolicited violent, and sexual, explicit media content shared over social media: Gender differences and links with prior exposure, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(12), 4296. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124296en
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph17124296en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623272
dc.description© 2020 The Authors. Published by MDPI. This is an open access article available under a Creative Commons licence. The published version can be accessed at the following link on the publisher’s website: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124296en
dc.description.abstractWhile there has been extensive research into consumption of “traditional” forms of explicit sexual and violent media (within pornography, videogames and movies), the informal exchange and viewing of explicit real-world violent and sexual content via social media is an under-investigated and potentially problematic behaviour. The current study used an online survey (n= 225: 169f, 55m, 1x, mean age 30.61 (SD 12.03)) to explore self-reported reactions to unsolicited explicit violent and sexual content that participants had received from friends or contacts. In line with our predictions based on previous studies of fictional explicit content, we found effects of both gender and prior exposure on these reactions. Specifically, females rated both sexual and violent explicit content as significantly less funny and exciting and more disturbing than males did. Amongst males, those with high previous exposure rated violent content as more exciting than those with lower or no prior experience. Regardless of gender, participants with higher exposure to sexual content rated it as funnier than those with mild or no exposure, and those with higher exposure to violent content rated it as more amusing and more exciting. However, contrary to what desensitization theories would predict, prior exposure did not attenuate how disturbing explicit content (of either a sexual or a violent nature) was rated. Multiple avenues for further investigation emerged from this preliminary cross-sectional study, and we suggest priorities for further qualitative or longitudinal work on this novel topic.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/12/4296en
dc.subjectexplicit contenten
dc.subjectsexualen
dc.subjectviolenten
dc.subjectunsoliciteden
dc.subjectcyberpsychologyen
dc.subjectsocial mediaen
dc.titleReactions to unsolicited violent, and sexual, explicit media content shared over social media: Gender differences and links with prior exposureen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.date.updated2020-06-16T13:30:07Z
dc.date.accepted2020-06-15
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW18062020JLen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-06-18en
refterms.dateFCD2020-06-18T14:34:12Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-18T14:37:02Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Nicklin_Swain_Lloyd_Reactions_ ...
Size:
274.6Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/