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dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Michael
dc.contributor.authorMas-Bleda, Amalia
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-27T09:28:59Z
dc.date.available2020-04-27T09:28:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-28
dc.identifier.citationThelwall, M. and Mas-Bleda, A. (2020) A gender equality paradox in academic publishing: Countries with a higher proportion of female first-authored journal articles have larger first author gender disparities between fields, Quantitative Science Studies DOI: 10.1162/qss_a_00050en
dc.identifier.issn2641-3337en
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/qss_a_00050
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623187
dc.description© 2020 The Authors. Published by MIT Press. This is an open access article available under a Creative Commons licence. The published version can be accessed at the following link on the publisher’s website: https://doi.org/10.1162/qss_a_00050en
dc.description.abstractCurrent attempts to address the shortfall of female researchers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) have not yet succeeded despite other academic subjects having female majorities. This article investigates the extent to which gender disparities are subject-wide or nation-specific by a first author gender comparison of 30 million articles from all 27 Scopus broad fields within the 31 countries with the most Scopus-indexed articles 2014-18. The results show overall and geocultural patterns as well as individual national differences. Almost half of the subjects were always more male (7; e.g., Mathematics) or always more female (6; e.g., Immunology & Microbiology) than the national average. A strong overall trend (Spearman correlation 0.546) is for countries with a higher proportion of female first-authored research to also have larger differences in gender disparities between fields (correlation 0.314 for gender ratios). This confirms the international gender equality paradox previously found for degree subject choices: increased gender equality overall associates with moderately greater gender differentiation between subjects. This is consistent with previous USA-based claims that gender differences in academic careers are partly due to (socially constrained) gender differences in personal preferences. Radical solutions may therefore be needed for some STEM subjects to overcome gender disparities.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMIT Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/qss_a_00050en
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectacademic publishingen
dc.subjectInternational differencesen
dc.subjectfield differencesen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectacademic publishingen
dc.subjectInternational differencesen
dc.subjectfield differencesen
dc.titleA gender equality paradox in academic publishing: Countries with a higher proportion of female first-authored journal articles have larger first author gender disparities between fieldsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalQuantitative Science Studiesen
dc.date.updated2020-04-25T14:44:14Z
dc.identifier.url
dc.date.accepted2020-04-22
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW27042020MTen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-04-27en
refterms.dateFCD2020-04-27T09:24:06Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-27T09:29:00Z


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