Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHunt, AP
dc.contributor.authorBuller, MJ
dc.contributor.authorMaley, MJ
dc.contributor.authorCostello, JT
dc.contributor.authorStewart, IB
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-19T10:31:31Z
dc.date.available2020-03-19T10:31:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-14
dc.identifier.citationHunt, A.P., Buller, M.J., Maley, M.J. et al. (2019) Validity of a noninvasive estimation of deep body temperature when wearing personal protective equipment during exercise and recovery. Military Medical Research, 6(20). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40779-019-0208-7en
dc.identifier.issn2054-9369en
dc.identifier.pmid31196190
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40779-019-0208-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/623146
dc.description©2019 The Authors. Published by BMC. This is an open access article available under a Creative Commons licence. The published version can be accessed at the following link on the publisher’s website: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40779-019-0208-7en
dc.description.abstract© 2019 The Author(s). Background: Deep body temperature is a critical indicator of heat strain. However, direct measures are often invasive, costly, and difficult to implement in the field. This study assessed the agreement between deep body temperature estimated from heart rate and that measured directly during repeated work bouts while wearing explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) protective clothing and during recovery. Methods: Eight males completed three work and recovery periods across two separate days. Work consisted of treadmill walking on a 1% incline at 2.5, 4.0, or 5.5 km/h, in a random order, wearing EOD protective clothing. Ambient temperature and relative humidity were maintained at 24 °C and 50% [Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) (20.9 ± 1.2) °C] or 32 °C and 60% [WBGT (29.0 ± 0.2) °C] on the separate days, respectively. Heart rate and gastrointestinal temperature (TGI) were monitored continuously, and deep body temperature was also estimated from heart rate (ECTemp). Results: The overall systematic bias between TGI and ECTemp was 0.01 °C with 95% limits of agreement (LoA) of ±0.64 °C and a root mean square error of 0.32 °C. The average error statistics among participants showed no significant differences in error between the exercise and recovery periods or the environmental conditions. At TGI levels of (37.0-37.5) °C, (37.5-38.0) °C, (38.0-38.5) °C, and > 38.5 °C, the systematic bias and ± 95% LoA were (0.08 ± 0.58) °C, (-0.02 ± 0.69) °C, (-0.07 ± 0.63) °C, and (-0.32 ± 0.56) °C, respectively. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate acceptable validity of the ECTemp up to 38.5 °C. Conducting work within an ECTemp limit of 38.4 °C, in conditions similar to the present study, would protect the majority of personnel from an excessive elevation in deep body temperature (> 39.0 °C).en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was financially supported by the Australian Government, managed by the National Security Science & Technology Centre within the Defence Science & Technology Organisation, and the US Government through the Technical Support Working Group within the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office.en
dc.formatapplication/pdfen
dc.languageeng
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen
dc.relation.urlhttps://mmrjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40779-019-0208-7en
dc.rightsLicence for published version: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectProtective clothingen
dc.subjectBody core temperatureen
dc.subjectHeat strainen
dc.subjectheat stressen
dc.subjectKalman Filteren
dc.subjectExplosive ordnance disposalen
dc.titleValidity of a noninvasive estimation of deep body temperature when wearing personal protective equipment during exercise and recoveryen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.eissn2054-9369
dc.identifier.journalMilitary Medical Researchen
dc.date.updated2020-03-18T18:30:39Z
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences & Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ap.hunt@qut.edu.au.
pubs.place-of-publicationEngland
dc.date.accepted2019-05-24
rioxxterms.funderAustralian Government, United States Governmenten
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW19032020MMen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-03-19en
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage20
dc.description.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFCD2020-03-19T10:31:10Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-19T10:31:31Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Validity of a noninvasive ...
Size:
2.125Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Licence for published version: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Licence for published version: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International