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dc.contributor.authorWara, Bahta
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Jan
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Hana
dc.contributor.authorBall, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-25T10:27:38Z
dc.date.available2019-07-25T10:27:38Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-17
dc.identifier.citationWara, B., Daly, J., Morrissey, H. and Ball, P. (2019) A study to explore learning style preferences of pharmacy students with regard to pharmaceutical calculations, International Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Research, 11(4), pp. 88-96.en
dc.identifier.issn0975-7066en
dc.identifier.doi10.22159/ijcpr.2019v11i4.34933en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/622592
dc.description.abstractObjective: Pharmaceutical calculations are an essential aspect of learning for pharmacy students in order to avoid drug dose errors and maintain patient safety in future practice. Learning styles influence how lecturers approach the teaching-learning process. So far no specific learning preference is believed to be most appropriate for the pharmacy curricular; however certain learning styles are favoured by students as they improve their understanding of course material, knowledge and performance. Methods: 148Master of pharmacy participants from the second and third year were given a questionnaire to complete during a compulsory Individual Readiness Assurance Test session. Participants were restricted to just one option. Results: Workshops with a tutor was the most selected (36%) followed by 25% of participants favouring formative assessments, 28% selected workbooks alone, 37% for whole-class lecturers and videos option was the least selected. Reasons for the most and least preferred learning styles were highlighted and separated into advantages and disadvantages using themes. In the knowledge test; 92% of participants selected “unsure” or “didn’t know” the answer, 29% had a partially correct answer and 19% selected incorrect answers. The overall order of ranking arose in regards to the most beneficial learning style which enhances performance. The responses revealed a variety of advantages and disadvantages which were reflected between year groups and similar to views obtained from recent literature. Students reflected a lack of understanding on extemporaneous preparation (EPs) terms used in pharmaceutical compounding practices, thus the university should consider addressing the lack of awareness and consider the best teaching-learning style in doing so. Conclusion: Overall the findings suggested that the sample students have similar views on the learning styles used to deliver pharmaceutical calculations on their academic performance to that expressed by the authors from recent published literature.en
dc.formatapplication/PDFen
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Researchen
dc.relation.urlhttps://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijcpr/article/view/34933en
dc.subjectAcademic performanceen
dc.subjectLearning Preferenceen
dc.subjectLearning stylesen
dc.subjectPharmaceutical calculationsen
dc.titleA study to explore learning style preferences of pharmacy students with regard to pharmaceutical calculationsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Current Pharmaceutical Researchen
dc.date.updated2019-07-19T08:56:20Z
dc.date.accepted2019-06-13
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW250719HMen
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-07-25en
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage88
dc.source.endpage96
refterms.dateFCD2019-07-25T10:27:28Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2019-07-25T10:27:39Z


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