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dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Kate
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Thayse Natacha
dc.contributor.authorChaves, Raquel
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Sara
dc.contributor.authorKatzmarzyk, Peter T
dc.contributor.authorMaia, José
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-16T12:05:39Z
dc.date.available2019-02-16T12:05:39Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-27
dc.identifier.citationNevill AM, Bryant E, Wilkinson K, Gomes TN, Chaves R, Pereira S, Katzmarzyk PT, Maia J, Duncan MJ. Can waist circumference provide a new “third” dimension to BMI when predicting percentage body fat in children? Insights using allometric modelling, Pediatric Obesity. 2018;e12491. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijpo.12491
dc.identifier.issn2047-6302
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ijpo.12491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/622099
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Body mass index (BMI) is often criticised for not being able to distinguish between lean and fat tissue. Waist circumference (WC), adjusted for stature, is proposed as an alternative weight-status index, as it is more sensitive to changes in central adiposity. Purpose: To combine the three dimensions of height, mass and WC to provide a simple, meaningful and more accurate index associated with percentage body fat (BF%). Methods: We employed a four independent sample design. Sample 1 consisted of 551 children (320 boys) (Mean ± S.D. of age = 7.2 ± 2.0 years), recruited from London, UK. Samples 2, 3 and 4 consisted of 5387 children (2649 boys) aged 7-17 years recruited from schools in Portugal. Allometric modelling was used to identify the most effective anthropometric index associated with BF%. The data from sample 2, 3 and 4 were used to confirm and cross validate the model derived in sample 1. Results: The allometric models from all four samples identified a positive mass exponent and a negative height exponent that was approximately twice that of the mass exponent and a waist circumference exponent that was approximately half the mass exponent. Consequently, the body-shape index most strongly associated with BF% was BMI√WC. The √WC component of the new index can simply be interpreted as a WC “weighting” of the traditional BMI. Conclusions: Compared to using BMI and WC in isolation, BMI√WC could provide a more effective and equally non-invasive proxy for BF% in children that can be used in public and community health settings.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ijpo.12491
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectadiposity
dc.subjectbioelectrical impedance
dc.subjectmultiplicative model
dc.subjectobesity
dc.titleCan waist circumference provide a new “third” dimension to BMI when predicting percentage body fat in children? Insights using allometric modelling
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalPediatric Obesity
dc.date.accepted2018-10-09
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW160219AN
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-02-16
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage8
refterms.dateFCD2019-02-16T12:05:40Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


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