• Are Mendeley reader counts high enough for research evaluations when articles are published?

      Thelwall, Mike (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2017-10-27)
      Purpose –Mendeley reader counts have been proposed as early indicators for the impact of academic publications. In response, this article assesses whether there are enough Mendeley readers for research evaluation purposes during the month when an article is first published. Design/methodology/approach – Average Mendeley reader counts were compared to average Scopus citation counts for 104520 articles from ten disciplines during the second half of 2016. Findings - Articles attracted, on average, between 0.1 and 0.8 Mendeley readers per article in the month in which they first appeared in Scopus. This is about ten times more than the average Scopus citation count. Research limitations/implications – Other subjects may use Mendeley more or less than the ten investigated here. The results are dependent on Scopus’s indexing practices, and Mendeley reader counts can be manipulated and have national and seniority biases. Practical implications – Mendeley reader counts during the month of publication are more powerful than Scopus citations for comparing the average impacts of groups of documents but are not high enough to differentiate between the impacts of typical individual articles. Originality/value - This is the first multi-disciplinary and systematic analysis of Mendeley reader counts from the publication month of an article.
    • Can museums find male or female audiences online with YouTube?

      Thelwall, Michael (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2018-08-31)
      Purpose: This article investigates if and why audience gender ratios vary between museum YouTube channels, including for museums of the same type. Design/methodology/approach: Gender ratios were examined for public comments on YouTube videos from 50 popular museums in English-speaking nations. Terms that were more frequently used by males or females in comments were also examined for gender differences. Findings: The ratio of female to male YouTube commenters varies almost a hundredfold between museums. Some of the difference could be explained by gendered interests in museum themes (e.g., military, art) but others were due to the topics chosen for online content and could address a gender minority audience. Practical implications: Museums can attract new audiences online with YouTube videos that target outside their expected demographics. Originality/value: This is the first analysis of YouTube audience gender for museums.
    • Do journal data sharing mandates work? Life sciences evidence from Dryad

      Thelwall, Mike; Kousha, Kayvan (Emerald, 2017-01-01)
      Purpose: Data sharing is widely thought to help research quality and efficiency. Since data sharing mandates are increasingly adopted by journals this paper assesses whether they work. Design/methodology: This study examines two evolutionary biology journals, Evolution and Heredity, that have data sharing mandates and make extensive use of Dryad. It uses a quantitative analysis of presence in Dryad, downloads and citations. Findings: Within both journals, data sharing seems to be complete showing that the mandates work on a technical level. Low correlations (0.15-0.18) between data downloads and article citation counts for articles published in 2012 within these journals indicate a weak relationship between data sharing and research impact. An average of 40-55 data downloads per article after a few years suggests that some use is found for shared life sciences data. Research limitations: The value of shared data uses is unclear. Practical implications: Data sharing mandates should be encouraged as an effective strategy. Originality/value: This is the first analysis of the effectiveness of data sharing mandates.
    • Do prestigious Spanish scholarly book publishers have more teaching impact?

      Mas-Bleda, Amalia; Thelwall, Mike (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2018-10-10)
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the educational value of prestigious and productive Spanish scholarly publishers based on mentions of their books in online scholarly syllabi. Design/methodology/approach Syllabus mentions of 15,117 books from 27 publishers were searched for, manually checked and compared with Microsoft Academic (MA) citations. Findings Most books published by Ariel, Síntesis, Tecnos and Cátedra have been mentioned in at least one online syllabus, indicating that their books have consistently high educational value. In contrast, few books published by the most productive publishers were mentioned in online syllabi. Prestigious publishers have both the highest educational impact based on syllabus mentions and the highest research impact based on MA citations. Research limitations/implications The results might be different for other publishers. The online syllabus mentions found may be a small fraction of the syllabus mentions of the sampled books. Practical implications Authors of Spanish-language social sciences and humanities books should consider general prestige when selecting a publisher if they want educational uptake for their work. Originality/value This is the first study assessing book publishers based on syllabus mentions.
    • Gender and image sharing on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp in the UK: Hobbying alone or filtering for friends?

      Thelwall, Mike; Vis, Farida (Emerald, 2017-10-01)
      Purpose: Despite the ongoing shift from text-based to image-based communication in the social web, supported by the affordances of smartphones, little is known about the new image sharing practices. Both gender and platform type seem likely to be important, but it is unclear how. Design/methodology/approach: This article surveys an age-balanced sample of UK Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp image sharers with a range of exploratory questions about platform use, privacy, interactions, technology use and profile pictures. Findings: Females shared photos more often overall and shared images more frequently on Snapchat, but males shared more images on Twitter, particularly for hobbies. Females also tended to have more privacy-related concerns but were more willing, in principle, to share pictures of their children. Females also interacted more through others’ images by liking and commenting on them. Both genders used supporting apps but in different ways: females applied filters and posted to albums whereas males retouched photos and used photo organising apps. Finally, males were more likely to be alone in their profile pictures. Practical implications: Those designing visual social web communication strategies to reach out to users should consider the different ways in which platforms are used by males and females to optimise their message for their target audience. Social implications: There are clear gender and platform differences in visual communication strategies. Overall, males may tend to have more informational, and females more relationship-based, skills or needs. Originality/value: This is the first detailed survey of electronic image sharing practices and the first to systematically compare the current generation of platforms.
    • Reuse of scientific data in academic publications

      He, Lin; Nahar, Vinita (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016-07-18)
      Purpose In recent years, a large number of data repositories have been built and used. However, the extent to which scientific data is reused in academic publications is still unknown. This article explores the functions of re-used scientific data in scholarly publication in different fields. Design/methodology/approach To address these questions, we identified 827 publications citing resources in the Dryad Digital Repository (DDR) indexed by Scopus from 2010 to 2015. Findings The results show that: (i) the number of citations to scientific data increases sharply over the years, but mainly from data-intensive disciplines, such as Agricultural, Biology Science, Environment Science and Medicine; (ii) the majority of citations are from the originating articles; (iii) researchers tend to reuse data produced by their own research groups. Research limitations/implications data may be re-used without being formally cited. Originality/value The conservatism in data sharing suggests that more should be done to encourage researchers to re-use other’s data.
    • YouTube Science Channel Video Presenters and Comments: Female Friendly or Vestiges of Sexism?

      Mas-Bleda, Amalia; Thelwall, Mike (Emerald, 2018-01-15)
      Purpose: This paper analyses popular YouTube science video channels for evidence of attractiveness to a female audience. Design/methodology/approach: The influence of presenter gender and commenter sentiment towards males and females is investigated for 50 YouTube science channels with a combined view-count approaching ten billion. This is cross-referenced with commenter gender as a proxy for audience gender. Findings: The ratio of male to female commenters varies between 1 and 39 to 1, but the low proportions of females seem to be due to the topic or presentation style rather than the gender of the presenter or the attitudes of the commenters. Although male commenters were more hostile to other males than to females, a few posted inappropriate sexual references that may alienate females. Research limitations: Comments reflect a tiny and biased sample of YouTube science channel viewers and so their analysis provides weak evidence. Practical implications: Sexist behaviour in YouTube commenting needs to be combatted but the data suggests that gender balance in online science presenters should not be the primary concern of channel owners. Originality/value: This is the largest scale analysis of gender in YouTube science communication.