• Nine terminology extraction Tools: Are they useful for translators?

      Costa, Hernani; Zaretskaya, Anna; Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Seghiri Domínguez, Míriam (MultiLingual, 2016-04-01)
      Terminology extraction tools (TETs) have become an indispensable resource in education, research and business. Today, users can find a great variety of terminology extraction tools of all kinds, and they all offer different features. Apart from many other areas, these tools are especially helpful in the professional translation setting. We do not know, however, if the existing tools have all the necessary features for this kind of work. In search for the answer, we looked at nine selected tools available on the market to find out if they provide the translators’ most favorite features.
    • NLP-enhanced self-study learning materials for quality healthcare in Europe

      Urbano Mendaña, Míriam; Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Seghiri Domínguez, Míriam; Aguado de Cea, G; Aussenac-Gilles, N; Nazarenko, A; Szulman, S (Université Paris 13, 2013-10)
      In this paper we present an overview of the TELL-ME project, which aims to develop innovative e-learning tools and self-study materials for teaching vocationally-specific languages to healthcare professionals, helping them to communicate at work. The TELL-ME e-learning platform incorporates a variety of NLP techniques to provide an array of diverse work-related exercises, selfassessment tools and an interactive dictionary of key vocabulary and concepts aimed at medics for Spanish, English and German. A prototype of the e-learning platform is currently under evaluation.
    • Size Matters: A Quantitative Approach to Corpus Representativeness

      Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Seghiri Domínguez, Míriam; Rabadán, Rosa (Publicaciones Universidad de León, 2010-06-01)
      We should always bear in mind that the assumption of representativeness ‘must be regarded largely as an act of faith’ (Leech 1991: 2), as at present we have no means of ensuring it, or even evaluating it objectively. (Tognini-Bonelli 2001: 57) Corpus Linguistics (CL) has not yet come of age. It does not make any difference whether we consider it a full-fledged linguistic discipline (Tognini-Bonelli 2000: 1) or, else, a set of analytical techniques that can be applied to any discipline (McEnery et al. 2006: 7). The truth is that CL is still striving to solve thorny, central issues such as optimum size, balance and representativeness of corpora (of the language as a whole or of some subset of the language). Corpus-driven/based studies rely on the quality and representativeness of each corpus as their true foundation for producing valid results. This entails deciding on valid external and internal criteria for corpus design and compilation. A basic tenet is that corpus representativeness determines the kinds of research questions that can be addressed and the generalizability of the results obtained (cf. Biber et al. 1988: 246). Unfortunately, faith and beliefs do not seem to ensure quality. In this paper we will attempt to deal with these key questions. Firstly, we will give a brief description of the R&D projects which originally have served as the main framework for this research. Secondly, we will focus on the complex notion of corpus representativeness and ideal size, from both a theoretical and an applied perspective. Finally, we will describe a computer application which has been developed as part of the research. This software will be used to verify whether a sample bilingual comparable corpus could be deemed representative.
    • Using semi-automatic compiled corpora for medical terminology and vocabulary building in the healthcare domain

      Gutiérrez Florido, Rut; Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Seghiri Domínguez, Míriam (Université Paris 13, 2013-10-28)
      English, Spanish and German are amongst the most spoken languages in Europe. Thus it is likely that patients from one EU member state seeking medical treatment in another will speak or understand one of these. However, there is a lack of resources to teach efficient communication between patients and medics. To combat this, the TELL-ME project will provide a fully targeted package. This includes learning materials for Medical English, Spanish and German aimed at medical staff already in the other countries or undertaking cross-border mobility. The learning process will be supported by computer-aided tools based on corpora. For this reason, in this workshop we present the semi-automatic compilation of the TELL-ME corpus, whose function is to support the e-learning platform of the TELL-ME project, together with its self-assessment exercises emphasising the importance of specialised terminology in the acquisition of communicative and language skills.