• Native language identification of fluent and advanced non-native writers

      Sarwar, Raheem; Rutherford, Attapol T; Hassan, Saeed-Ul; Rakthanmanon, Thanawin; Nutanong, Sarana (Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020-04-30)
      Native Language Identification (NLI) aims at identifying the native languages of authors by analyzing their text samples written in a non-native language. Most existing studies investigate this task for educational applications such as second language acquisition and require the learner corpora. This article performs NLI in a challenging context of the user-generated-content (UGC) where authors are fluent and advanced non-native speakers of a second language. Existing NLI studies with UGC (i) rely on the content-specific/social-network features and may not be generalizable to other domains and datasets, (ii) are unable to capture the variations of the language-usage-patterns within a text sample, and (iii) are not associated with any outlier handling mechanism. Moreover, since there is a sizable number of people who have acquired non-English second languages due to the economic and immigration policies, there is a need to gauge the applicability of NLI with UGC to other languages. Unlike existing solutions, we define a topic-independent feature space, which makes our solution generalizable to other domains and datasets. Based on our feature space, we present a solution that mitigates the effect of outliers in the data and helps capture the variations of the language-usage-patterns within a text sample. Specifically, we represent each text sample as a point set and identify the top-k stylistically similar text samples (SSTs) from the corpus. We then apply the probabilistic k nearest neighbors’ classifier on the identified top-k SSTs to predict the native languages of the authors. To conduct experiments, we create three new corpora where each corpus is written in a different language, namely, English, French, and German. Our experimental studies show that our solution outperforms competitive methods and reports more than 80% accuracy across languages.
    • A scalable framework for stylometric analysis of multi-author documents

      Sarwar, Raheem; Yu, Chenyun; Nutanong, Sarana; Urailertprasert, Norawit; Vannaboot, Nattapol; Rakthanmanon, Thanawin; Pei, Jian; Manolopoulos, Yannis; Sadiq, Shazia W; Li, Jianxin (Springer, 2018-05-13)
      Stylometry is a statistical technique used to analyze the variations in the author’s writing styles and is typically applied to authorship attribution problems. In this investigation, we apply stylometry to authorship identification of multi-author documents (AIMD) task. We propose an AIMD technique called Co-Authorship Graph (CAG) which can be used to collaboratively attribute different portions of documents to different authors belonging to the same community. Based on CAG, we propose a novel AIMD solution which (i) significantly outperforms the existing state-of-the-art solution; (ii) can effectively handle a larger number of co-authors; and (iii) is capable of handling the case when some of the listed co-authors have not contributed to the document as a writer. We conducted an extensive experimental study to compare the proposed solution and the best existing AIMD method using real and synthetic datasets. We show that the proposed solution significantly outperforms existing state-of-the-art method.