• Management of 201 individuals with emotionally unstable personality disorders: A naturalistic observational study in real-world inpatient setting

      Shahpesandy, Homayun; Mohammed-Ali, Rosemary; Oakes, Michael; Al-Kubaisy, Tarik; Cheetham, Anna; Anene, Moses; The Hartsholme Centre, Long Leys Road, Lincoln, LN1 1FS, Lincolnshire NHS Foundation Trust, UK. (Maghira & Maas Publications, 2021-06-03)
      BACKGROUND: Emotionally unstable personality disorder (EUPD) is a challenging condition with a prevalence of 20% in inpatient services. Psychotherapy is the preferred treatment; nevertheless, off-license medications are widely used. OBJECTIVES: To identify socio-demographics, clinical and service-delivery characteristics of people with EUPD admitted to inpatient services between 1st January 2017 and 31st December 2018. METHODS: A retrospective review using data from patients' records. Individuals, age 18-65 were included. Statistical analysis was conducted by the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test and Chi-squared test with Yates's continuity correction. RESULTS: Of 1646 inpatients, 201 (12.2%); had the diagnosis of EUPD; 133 (66.0%) women, 68 (44.0%). EUPD was significantly (P < .001) more prevalent in women (18.2%) than men (7.4%). EUPD patients were significantly (P < .001) younger (32.2 years) than patients without EUPD (46 years), and had significantly (P < .001) more admissions (1.74) than patients without EUPD (1.2 admission). 70.5% of patients had one and 17.0% two Axis-I psychiatric co-morbidities. Substance use was significantly (P < .001) more often in men (57.3%) than in women (28.5%). Significantly (P = 0.047) more women (68.4%) than men (53.0%) reported sexual abuse. 87.5% used polypharmacy. Antidepressants were significantly (P = 0.02) often prescribed to women (76.6%) than men (69.1%). Significantly (P = 0.02) more women (83.5%) than men (67.6%) were on antipsychotics. 57.2% of the patients were on anxiolytics, 40.0% on hypnotics and 25.8% on mood stabilisers. CONCLUSION: EUPD is a complex condition with widespread comorbidity. The term EUPD, Borderline Personality Disorder is unsuitable, stigmatising and too simplistic to reflect the nature, gravity and psychopathology of this syndrome.