• A flexible framework for collocation retrieval and translation from parallel and comparable corpora

      Rivera, Oscar Mendoza; Mitkov, Ruslan; Corpas Pastor, Gloria (John Benjamins, 2018)
      This paper outlines a methodology and a system for collocation retrieval and translation from parallel and comparable corpora. The methodology was developed with translators and language learners in mind. It is based on a phraseology framework, applies statistical techniques, and employs source tools and online resources. The collocation retrieval and translation has proved successful for English and Spanish and can be easily adapted to other languages. The evaluation results are promising and future goals are proposed. Furthermore, conclusions are drawn on the nature of comparable corpora and how they can be better exploited to suit particular needs of target users.
    • Constructional idioms of ‘insanity’ in English and Spanish: A corpus-based study

      Corpas Pastor, Gloria (Elsevier, 2021-02-10)
      This paper presents a corpus-based study of constructions in English and Spanish, with a special emphasis on equivalent semantic-functional counterparts, and potential mismatches. Although usage/corpus-based Construction Grammar (CxG) has attracted much attention in recent years, most studies have dealt exclusively with monolingual constructions. In this paper we will focus on two constructions that represent conventional ways to express ‘insanity’ in both languages. The analysis will cover grammatical, semantic and informative aspects in order to establish a multi-linguistic prototype of the constructions. To that end, data from several giga-token corpora of contemporary spoken English and Spanish (parallel and comparable) have been selected. This study advances the explanatory potential of constructional idioms for the study of idiomaticity, variability and cross-language analysis. In addition, relevant findings on the dialectal distribution of certain idiom features across both languages and their national varieties are also reported.
    • Register-Specific Collocational Constructions in English and Spanish: A Usage-Based Approach

      Pastor, Gloria Corpas (Science Publications, 2015-03-01)
      Constructions are usage-based, conventionalised pairings of form and function within a cline of complexity and schematisation. Most research within Construction Grammar has focused on the monolingual description of schematic constructions: Mainly in English, but to a lesser extent in other languages as well. By contrast, very little constructional analyses have been carried out across languages. In this study we will focus on a type of partially substantive construction from the point of view of contrastive analysis and translation which, to the best of our knowledge, is one of the first studies of this kind. The first half of the article lays down the theoretical foundations of the study and introduces Construction Grammar as well as other formalisms used in literature in order to provide a construal account of collocations, a pervasive phenomenon in language. The experimental part describes the case study of V NP collocations with disease/enfermedad in comparable corpora in English and Spanish, both in the general domain and in the specialised medical domain. It is provided a comparative analysis of these constructions across domains and languages in terms of token-type ratio (constructional restriction-rate), lexical function, type of determiner, frequency ranking of the verbal collocate and domain specificity of collocates, among others. New measures to assess construal bondness will be put forward (lexical filledness rate and individual productivity rate) and special attention will be paid to register-dependent equivalent semantic-functional counterparts in English and Spanish and mismatches.
    • Teaching idioms for translation purposes: a trilingual corpus-based glossary applied to phraseodidactics (ES/EN/DE)

      Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Hidalgo Ternero, Carlos Manuel; Bautista Zambrada, María Rosario; Martínez, Florentina Mena; Strohschen, Carola (Peter Lang, 2020)
      Phraseology plays a pivotal role in the development of translation competence as well as in translation quality assessment. Thus far, however, there remains a paucity of research on how to best teach idioms for translation purposes. Against such a background, this study aims to shed some light on the multiple applications of phraseodidactics to translation training. We will follow a corpus-based methodology and, for the sake of the argument, the focus will be on somatisms in Spanish, English and German. The overall structure of this paper takes the form of four sections. Section One begins by laying out the theoretical dimensions of phraseology and its convergence with translation. In section two we examine the main components of a corpus-based glossary of somatisms, named Glossomatic, and how it can be employed to establish ad hoc phraseological equivalences in those cases (analysed in section three) where the manipulation of idioms and the absence of one-to-one phraseological correspondence may pose some problems to translation. In this regard, given the importance of accurately conveying the pragmatic, semantic and discursive load of an idiom into a TT and, concomitantly, conveying the manipulation depicted in the ST, section four presents a teaching proposal in which students are prompted with a set of strategies and steps to be implemented with the aid of the glossary in order to solve these issues. Overall, the insights gained from this research will prove useful not only in developing trainees’ phraseological competence but also in giving centre stage to phraseodidactics in Translation Studies.
    • The way to analyse ‘way’: A case study in word-specific local grammar

      Hanks, Patrick; Može, Sara (Oxford Academic, 2019-02-11)
      Traditionally, dictionaries are meaning-driven—that is, they list different senses (or supposed senses) of each word, but do not say much about the phraseology that distinguishes one sense from another. Grammars, on the other hand, are structure-driven: they attempt to describe all possible structures of a language, but say little about meaning, phraseology, or collocation. In both disciplines during the 20th century, the practice of inventing evidence rather than discovering it led to intermittent and unpredictable distortions of fact. Since 1987, attempts have been made in both lexicography (Cobuild) and syntactic theory (pattern grammar, construction grammar) to integrate meaning and phraseology. Corpora now provide empirical evidence on a large scale for lexicosyntactic description, but there is still a long way to go. Many cherished beliefs must be abandoned before a synthesis between empirical lexical analysis and grammatical theory can be achieved. In this paper, by empirical analysis of just one word (the noun way), we show how corpus evidence can be used to tackle the complexities of lexical and constructional meaning, providing new insights into the lexis-grammar interface.