• Detecting semantic difference: a new model based on knowledge and collocational association

      Taslimipoor, Shiva; Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Rohanian, Omid; Corpas Pastor, Gloria; Colson, Jean-Pierre (John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2020-05-08)
      Semantic discrimination among concepts is a daily exercise for humans when using natural languages. For example, given the words, airplane and car, the word flying can easily be thought and used as an attribute to differentiate them. In this study, we propose a novel automatic approach to detect whether an attribute word represents the difference between two given words. We exploit a combination of knowledge-based and co-occurrence features (collocations) to capture the semantic difference between two words in relation to an attribute. The features are scores that are defined for each pair of words and an attribute, based on association measures, n-gram counts, word similarity, and Concept-Net relations. Based on these features we designed a system that run several experiments on a SemEval-2018 dataset. The experimental results indicate that the proposed model performs better, or at least comparable with, other systems evaluated on the same data for this task.
    • Leveraging large corpora for translation using the Sketch Engine

      Moze, Sarah; Krek, Simon (Cambridge University Press, 2018)
    • Translating English verbal collocations into Spanish: On distribution and other relevant differences related to diatopic variation

      Corpas Pastor, Gloria (John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015-12-21)
      Language varieties should be taken into account in order to enhance fluency and naturalness of translated texts. In this paper we will examine the collocational verbal range for prima-facie translation equivalents of words like decision and dilemma, which in both languages denote the act or process of reaching a resolution after consideration, resolving a question or deciding something. We will be mainly concerned with diatopic variation in Spanish. To this end, we set out to develop a giga-token corpus-based protocol which includes a detailed and reproducible methodology sufficient to detect collocational peculiarities of transnational languages. To our knowledge, this is one of the first observational studies of this kind. The paper is organised as follows. Section 1 introduces some basic issues about the translation of collocations against the background of languages’ anisomorphism. Section 2 provides a feature characterisation of collocations. Section 3 deals with the choice of corpora, corpus tools, nodes and patterns. Section 4 covers the automatic retrieval of the selected verb + noun (object) collocations in general Spanish and the co-existing national varieties. Special attention is paid to comparative results in terms of similarities and mismatches. Section 5 presents conclusions and outlines avenues of further research.
    • The way to analyse ‘way’: A case study in word-specific local grammar

      Hanks, Patrick; Može, Sara (Oxford Academic, 2019-02-11)
      Traditionally, dictionaries are meaning-driven—that is, they list different senses (or supposed senses) of each word, but do not say much about the phraseology that distinguishes one sense from another. Grammars, on the other hand, are structure-driven: they attempt to describe all possible structures of a language, but say little about meaning, phraseology, or collocation. In both disciplines during the 20th century, the practice of inventing evidence rather than discovering it led to intermittent and unpredictable distortions of fact. Since 1987, attempts have been made in both lexicography (Cobuild) and syntactic theory (pattern grammar, construction grammar) to integrate meaning and phraseology. Corpora now provide empirical evidence on a large scale for lexicosyntactic description, but there is still a long way to go. Many cherished beliefs must be abandoned before a synthesis between empirical lexical analysis and grammatical theory can be achieved. In this paper, by empirical analysis of just one word (the noun way), we show how corpus evidence can be used to tackle the complexities of lexical and constructional meaning, providing new insights into the lexis-grammar interface.