• ‘A less unpalatable alternative’: Executive leaders strategically redefining their work in primary MATs

      Spicksley, Kathryn (SAGE, 2020-09-18)
      Since the election of the Coalition government in 2010, an increasing number of primary schools in England have converted to academy status. This article explores how executive leaders working in primary academies construct academy freedoms and their attitudes towards their local authorities. Interviews with four executive leaders working in two contrasting Multi-Academy Trusts were analysed using critical discourse analysis. Findings show that in these primary academies, leaders chose to discursively distance themselves from other academy schools, and instead construct themselves as continuing the best traditions of local authority support. The findings indicate that the professional identities of academy leaders, as key policy actors, have an impact on how national policy is interpreted and enacted. The discourse of these academy leaders suggests that primary academisation has led to school leaders appropriating methods of strategic redefinition, to navigate the new post-2010 education landscape and construct new professional identities.
    • Local Authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic: Interim project findings briefing

      Jolly, Andy; Sojka, Bozena; Dickson, Eve; Qureshi, Fizza; Stamp, Dave; Morgan, Benjamin (University of Wolverhampton, 2020-05-21)
      This interim briefing presents initial findings from a project exploring the support available to migrants with no recourse to public funds during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research included a survey of local authorities in England, and a call for evidence from migrant support organisations in England, Scotland and Wales. More than 90 percent of local authorities had not shared information about support for people with NRPF during the pandemic, and support organisations reported that service users had struggled to access food, shelter and subsistence support during the pandemic.
    • Local authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic: research report

      Dickson, Eve; Jolly, Andrew; Morgan, Benjamin; Qureshi, Fizza; Sojka, Bozena; Stamp, Dave (ICRD, 2020-08-03)
    • London’s children and young people who are not British citizens: A profile

      Jolly, Andrew; Thomas, Sian; Stanyer, James (Greater London Authority, 2020-01-09)
      This report outlines an updated estimate of the numbers of young Londoners who are foreign-born, or foreign nationals, and disaggregates the likely numbers who are undocumented and who are nationals of EEA+ countries. The report outlines which London boroughs have particular concentrations of children and young people from a migrant backgound and concludes with a discussion about how many have taken up the various regularisation pathways that are available to them.
    • Making for Change: an independent evaluation of Making for Change: skills in a fashion training & manufacturing workshop

      Caulfield, Laura; Curtis, Kerry; Simpson, Ella (London College of Fashion, UAL, 2018-01-31)
      Making for Change Fashion Training and Manufacturing Workshop is a partnership between HM Prison Service and London College of Fashion, UAL (LCF). Making for Change takes an innovative approach in prison, linked to improving the engagement of women offenders in prison industries by providing training in fashion production skills and accrediting participants with industry-recognised qualifications; offering a route away from re-offending whilst simultaneously addressing the skills shortage within the UK fashion manufacturing industry.
    • Multiple and complex needs in the West Midlands: individuals with lived experience tell their story

      Caulfield, Laura; Massie, Rachel (University of Wolverhampton/ West Midlands Combined Authority, 2019-04-01)
    • Multiple and complex needs in the West Midlands: Research briefing paper

      Hopley, Rachel; Caulfield, Laura (University of Wolverhampton, 2021-01)
    • Music, education, and opportunity

      Caulfield, Laura; Haigh, Katy (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2018-09-10)
      Good Vibrations: what we do Good Vibrations is a charity known for its use of gamelan music in criminal justice settings. The gamelan is an orchestra of percussion instruments from Indonesia, made up of various metallophones, xylophones, gongs and drums. You can see and hear one at HMP Peterborough here: https://www.goodvibrations.org.uk/watchsome- clips/watch-a documentary-on-a-typicalgamelan- in-prison-project/
    • Opening the ‘black box’: Organisational adaptation and resistance to institutional isomorphism in a prime-led employment services programme

      Rees, James; Taylor, Rebecca; Damm, Chris (SAGE, 2022-08-17)
      The UK’s Work Programme (2012-18) was a major employment services programme, inspired by new public management principles. A relatively small number of directly commissioned ‘prime providers’ were paid by the central Government largely according to the number of job-outcomes their service users achieved but were given a ‘black box’ to design their own services and subcontracting arrangements. Drawing on an empirical study of subcontracted service providers, and focusing on those from the third sector, the paper shows that within this prime-led commissioning model, subcontractors came under sustained pressure to adjust their operational practices. We draw on institutional isomorphism to show that isomorphic pressures were experienced because of both the design and implementation of the Work Programme. Although there were strong pressures pushing towards convergence, however, the different starting positions of subcontractors meant that these changes were not entirely deterministic and some attempts at resistance were observed amongst third sector providers. Their diverse institutional contexts, including positioning and wider interest in the field, shaped how they navigated and responded to isomorphic pressures, ultimately mitigating homogenisation. The paper contributes a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which provider organisations experience, interpret and respond to structural pressures within an evolving quasi-market. The findings have implications for public service reform programmes featuring quasi-markets that are intended to encourage innovation and a diversity of provision, particularly when promoting mission-led, third sector organisations (TSOs).
    • Participatory filmmaking in voluntary sector research: innovative or problematic?

      Vita, Terry; Andrew, Jolly (Policy Press, 2019-08-29)
      This paper draws both on the authors’ experiences of making a participatory film exploring collective leadership in diverse communities, and on a world café style workshop at the 2018 Voluntary Sector and Volunteering Research Conference organised by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations and the Voluntary Sector Studies Network. The intention is to provoke dialogue about the opportunities and challenges of participatory filmmaking as a research method, and whether it is an appropriate methodological approach for voluntary sector research, with the potential to advance thinking on about and the use of mixed-media methods.
    • The perceived benefits of an arts project for health and wellbeing of older offenders

      Wilkinson, DJ; Caulfield, LS; Department of Psychology, University of Worcester , Worcester , United Kingdom. (Leibniz-Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID), 2017-03-03)
      © 2017, PsychOpen. All rights reserved. The increasing ageing prison population is becoming a pressing issue throughout the criminal justice system. Alongside the rising population, are a host of health and wellbeing issues that contribute to older offenders needs whilst in prison. It has been recommended that meaningful activities can have positive effects on this population and therefore this paper uniquely reviews older offenders accounts of taking part in an arts based project, Good Vibrations, whilst imprisoned. The Good Vibrations project engages individuals in Gamelan music making with an end of project performance. This study used independent in-depth interviews to capture the voices of older offenders who took part in an art based prison project. The interview data was analysed using thematic analysis, which highlighted themes that were consistent with other populations who have taken part in a Good Vibrations project, along with specific age relating issues of mobility, motivation, identity and wellbeing.
    • Place leadership and the role of the third sector and civil society

      Potluka, O; Sancino, A; Diamond, J; Rees, J (Bristol University Press, 2021-02-09)
      Only relatively recently, place leadership has become an important debate in the leadership studies and public administration literatures. From a place leadership perspective, there is clearly a potential role for third sector organisations and the voluntary engagement that citizens can play for places through different activities, such as for example social innovation, public services provision, volunteering, civic engagement, advocacy, enhancement of the quality of life, strengthening of social bonds and social cohesion. However, the topic of civil society and third sector organisations is still neglected in research and public policy debates on place-based leadership. Our special issue aims at filling this gap.
    • Policing the threat: ‘implied hate crime’, homophobia and behaviour change

      Iafrati, Steve; Williams, Clare (Sheffield Hallum University, 2016-12-17)
      This research is based on focus groups with gay men in the Black Country, an area o f the West Midlands and examines the extent to which the men change their behaviour to avoid being identified as gay. Frequently, behaviour change was not in response to direct or overt threats, but instead, in response to perceived or implied threats. The way in which this limits personal freedoms and feelings o f community safety should be regarded as a key element of hate crime. The men in the focus groups also recognised clear geographical dimensions to this implied hate crime, with certain areas being identified as hostile. Problematically, relying solely on quantitative data to inform patterns o f hate crime is therefore limited as it (i) fails to include perceptions, (ii) fails to recognise that certain areas are avoided because o f perceived threats, and (iii) fails to recognise underreporting. A strategic response to hate crime must involve being more proactive and a multi-agency approach, with this article identifying how this research led to a sustainable and strategic response.
    • The public sector and co-creation in turbulent times: A systematic literature review on robust governance in the COVID-19 emergency

      Scognamiglio, Fulvio; Sancino, Alessandro; Caló, Francesca; Jacklin‐Jarvis, Carol; Rees, James (Wiley, 2022-08-02)
      The capacity of public sector of co-creating with other stakeholders is challenged by the increasing presence of disruptive turbulent events, such as the COVID-19. At this regard, robustness has been identified as a suitable response to deal with this kind of events. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed how public sector organizations have co-created with other actors during the COVID-19 and what have been the contribution of robust governance strategies. Our findings point firstly to the empirical validity of the robustness concept, providing evidence of the extensive use of robust governance strategies into the co-creation processes. Second, we identified a configurational approach to robustness, with governments co-creating by simultaneously employing several robust strategies. Thirdly, we observed a more active involvement of societal stakeholders, with emergence of proto-institutions and potential threats to the political system.
    • Recommendations for recruiting and retaining adolescent girls in chronic exercise (training) research studies

      Massie, Rachel; Smith, Brett; Tolfrey, Keith (MDPI, 2015-08-26)
      Extensive challenges are often encountered when recruiting participants to chronic exercise (training) studies. High participant burden during chronic exercise training programmes can result in low uptake to and/or poor compliance with the study. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify factors affecting adolescent girls’ recruitment and adherence to chronic exercise training research studies. Twenty-six adolescent girls (aged 12 to 15 years) participated in one of five focus groups discussing recruitment and retention to exercise physiology research involving a chronic exercise training programme. A thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and eight final themes were inductively identified. Seven evidence-based practical recommendations are suggested to improve the recruitment and retention of participants for prospective, chronic exercise training studies. Successful recruitment requires: (i) the defining of exercise-related terms; (ii) appropriate choice of recruitment material; and (iii) an understanding of participant motivations. Retention strategies include: (iv) regular monitoring of participant motives; and (v) small groups which foster peer and researcher support. Finally, (vi) friendship and ability groups were favoured in addition to (vii) a variety of activities to promote adherence to an exercise training programme.
    • Returnees: Unwanted citizens or cherished countrymen

      Sojka, Bozena; Maarja, Saar; Rees, James; Marco, Pomati; Elke, Heins (Policy Press, 2020-07-08)
    • Sign language interpreter aptitude: The trials and tribulations of a longitudinal study

      Stone, Christopher (2017-01-01)
      This paper discusses the process of undertaking an exploratory longitudinal study of language learning and interpreter aptitude. It discusses the context of aptitude testing, the test selection for a test battery, the recruitment of subjects within the small-scale study (n=22) and the administration of that battery within the context of whether longitudinal studies are feasible with small cohorts of sign language interpreters. Sign languages continue to be languages of limited diffusion in Europe. Even with gradually increasing numbers of ‘hearing’ sign language users, typically those wishing to become sign language interpreters do not have high levels of sign language fluency prior to enrolling in sign language interpreter training. As such, these students need to gain fluency in sign language, whilst also beginning to engage in interpreter education and interpreting-skills development. To date there is little understanding of how best to screen sign language interpreter program applicants to ensure the effective use of resources, i.e. to educate those who will both learn sign language to C1 fluency (Pro-signs, 2016) during the BA and also be able to learn how to interpret. Longitudinal studies enable us to take a longer view of learning and the professionalisation of skills and knowledge. They do, however, require significant time and this in itself can prove to be an obstacle when university researchers are required to produce tangible research outputs for career goals such as promotion or tenure.
    • Social inclusion, immigration legislation and social services

      Jolly, Andy; Liamputtong, Pranee (Springer, 2021-05-06)
      Undocumented migrants are at particular risk of social exclusion, both because of the precarity of their immigration status, and because of restrictive welfare policies at a national level, which make it more difficult for non-nationals to access social security and other welfare programs. In the absence of access to other forms of support, health and social care services have a key role in supporting social inclusion for families with an irregular migration status. However, the tension between the focus of immigration legislation on enforcement and control on the one hand; and the emphasis of child welfare legislation on rights and care on the other, can lead to ethical dilemmas for workers in health and social care settings. This chapter discusses how some of these tensions can work out in practice. Using the concept of statutory neglect, it outlines the different forms of social exclusion faced by irregular migrant families, and concludes with a discussion of the implications for the role of health and social care services, with suggestions for how to promote social inclusion for migrant children and families.
    • State of the Walsall voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

      Caulfield, Laura; Massie, Rachel (One Walsall, 2019-03-11)
    • Statutory neglect and care in a pandemic

      Jolly, Andrew (SAGE Publications, 2020-07-23)
      Much has been written about the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in care homes in Europe and North America, with claims that the high mortality rate has been worsened by the policy decisions taken by governments. This essay argues that the concept of statutory neglect is a useful framework for understanding situations where neglect results from law or policy rather than the lack of action by an individual caregiver.