• Firewalls: A necessary tool to enable social rights for undocumented migrants in social work

      Hermansson, Linus; Lundberg, Anna; Gruber, Sabine; Jolly, Andrew; Lind, Jacob; Righard, Erica; Scott, Hanna (SAGE Publications, 2020-05-29)
      Firewalls are clear divisions between border policing and the provision of basic social rights. They have a dual character: to ensure that no information collected with the purpose of safeguarding basic social rights should be shared for immigration control purposes; and that migrants should not be subject to immigration control when being present at, or in the vicinity, of religious, private and public institutions upholding and providing social rights. This article suggests a normative argument for ‘firewalls’ in the context of social work and develops the concept theoretically as a principle practised and negotiated at different scales.
    • From the outside in: narratives of creative arts practitioners working in the criminal justice system

      Caulfield, Laura; Simpson, Ella; Morgan, Catherine (Wiley-Blackwell, 2019-09-04)
      The penal voluntary sector is highly variegated in its roles, practices and functions, though research to date has largely excluded the experiences of front-line practitioners. We argue that engaging with the narratives of practitioners can provide fuller appreciation of the potential of the sector’s work. Though life story and narrative have been recognised as important in offender desistance (Maruna, 2001), the narrative identities of creative arts practitioners, who are important ‘change agents’ (Albertson, 2015), are typically absent. This is despite evidence to suggest that a practitioner’s life history can be a significant and positive influence in the rehabilitation of offenders (Harris, 2017). Using narratological analysis (Bal, 2009), this study examined the narratives of 19 creative practitioners in prisons in England and Wales. Of particular interest were the formative experiences of arts practitioners in their journey to prison work. The findings suggest that arts practitioners identify with an ‘outsider’ status and may be motivated by an ethic of mutual aid. In the current climate of third sector involvement in the delivery of criminal justice interventions, such a capacity may be both a strength and weakness for arts organisations working in this field.
    • From the Windrush Generation to the ‘Air Jamaica generation’: local authority support for families with no recourse to public funds

      Jolly, Andrew; Heins, Elke; Rees, James; Needham, Catherine (Policy Press, 2019-07-22)
      Over the past year, immigration has been a continued focus of policy debates in the global north, with governments in Hungary and Italy elected on openly anti-immigration and ‘welfare chauvinist’ platforms. On the other side of the Atlantic the US federal government family separations policy has also been a source of fierce dispute. In the UK, the potential implications of Brexit for EU migrants in the UK and the treatment of the children of the ‘Windrush Generation’ under the hostile (or ‘compliant’) environment has caused particular controversy and the precipitated the resignation of the Home Secretary.
    • Fun, lifelong relationships and a safer community: understanding collective leadership practice in a grassroots association

      Jacklin-Jarvis, Carol; Rees, James (Bristol University Press, 2021-08-31)
      The relational processes and practices that create and sustain grassroots associations have received limited attention from researchers. This article addresses this gap, exploring collective leadership of grassroots associations through a ‘leadership-as-practice’ lens (Raelin, 2016a; 2016b). It adopts the concept of ‘bundles’ of leadership practice (Schatzki, 2005) to analyse data from a single ethnographic case study. Adopting this conceptual lens, we identify a set of ‘bundles’ of related practices – organising, engaging and accounting – that constitute the enduring reality of the grassroots association’s collective leadership.
    • Hard work / workload: discursive constructions of teacher work in policy and practice

      Spicksley, Kathryn (Informa UK Limited, 2022-04-12)
      This paper explores contradictory constructions of teacher work across policy discourse and professional practice. It draws from a corpus-assisted critical discourse analysis of 363 political speeches published on England’s Department for Education website between 2010 and 2018, and qualitative interviews with two executive leaders working in English primary academy schools. Findings indicate a contradiction in the way that teacher work was constructed by government ministers, with hard work constructed positively as leading to improved educational outcomes, but workload negatively constructed as a problem which needed to be solved. This contradiction was echoed in school leaders’ discursive constructions of teacher work. Extending previous research on teacher workload, I raise the possibility that it is not only workload, but the requirement to navigate contradictory discursive constructions of teacher work which may cause damage to teachers’ professional identities.
    • Immigration policies: enforcing borders, driving hunger and creating destitution

      Jolly, Andrew; Dickson, Eve; Garande, Kimberley; Richmond-Bishop, Imogen; Singh, Jasber (University of Wolverhampton, 2021-04-30)
      There is a long history of immigration control and welfare conditionality in the UK, but the interaction between immigration policies and food poverty is underresearched. This article outlines the links between immigration control and food poverty or destitution in the UK. Drawing on insights from the existing literature and a structured discussion at a participatory workshop for researchers and practitioners, the article identifies issues for research and practice around the issue of the No Recourse to Public Funds (NRPF) immigration rule and food poverty. We argue that future research should take a rights based approach to immigration and food poverty that engages with both the history of immigration control and the intent of public policies such as the NRPF rule.
    • Increasing athlete knowledge of mental health and intentions to seek help: The State of Mind Ireland (SOMI) Pilot Program

      Breslin, Gavin; Haughey, Tandy; O'Brien, Wesley; Caulfield, Laura; Robertson, Alexa; Lawlor, Martin (Human Kinetics, 2018-03-01)
      The present study had three aims, to determine: (a) whether providing a curriculum-based mental health awareness program to athletes increased knowledge of mental health and intentions to offer support; (b) whether the program increased resilience and well-being compared to a control group; and (c) the feasibility of the program. A total of 100 participants (Mage = 20.78; SD = 2.91; male = 59) either attended the program or were part of a control group. Participants completed questionnaires pre-, post-, and 3-months post-intervention, although there was a low participant return rate for the 3-month follow-up (n = 15). Participants were invited to take part in a focus group to explore program relevance. Knowledge of mental health and intentions to offer support increased for the intervention group, compared to the control. The program with some modification could be integrated into university sport courses to promote mental health awareness.
    • ‘It’s not just music, it helps you from inside’: Mixing methods to understand the impact of music on young people in contact with the criminal justice system

      Jolly, Andrew; Devi-McGleish, Yasmin; Simpson, Ella; Caulfield, Laura (SAGE, 2020-07-02)
      In response to some of the criticisms of previous research into the arts in criminal justice, this paper presents findings from research with a music programme run by a Youth Offending team (YOT). Data was collected on the attendance of 42 participants at YOT appointments - matched against a comparison group - and measures of change over time in musical development, attitudes and behaviour, and well-being. Participants who completed the music programme were statistically more likely to attend YOT appointments than a comparison group. There were statistically significant improvements in participants’ self-reported well-being and musical ability over the course of the project. Effect sizes reached the minimum important difference for quantitative measures. To understand not just if, but how, any impact was achieved, and to ensure the voice of the young people was heard, the quantitative elements of the research were complemented and extended by in-depth interviews with 23 participants.
    • ‘A less unpalatable alternative’: Executive leaders strategically redefining their work in primary MATs

      Spicksley, Kathryn (SAGE, 2020-09-18)
      Since the election of the Coalition government in 2010, an increasing number of primary schools in England have converted to academy status. This article explores how executive leaders working in primary academies construct academy freedoms and their attitudes towards their local authorities. Interviews with four executive leaders working in two contrasting Multi-Academy Trusts were analysed using critical discourse analysis. Findings show that in these primary academies, leaders chose to discursively distance themselves from other academy schools, and instead construct themselves as continuing the best traditions of local authority support. The findings indicate that the professional identities of academy leaders, as key policy actors, have an impact on how national policy is interpreted and enacted. The discourse of these academy leaders suggests that primary academisation has led to school leaders appropriating methods of strategic redefinition, to navigate the new post-2010 education landscape and construct new professional identities.
    • Local Authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic: Interim project findings briefing

      Jolly, Andy; Sojka, Bozena; Dickson, Eve; Qureshi, Fizza; Stamp, Dave; Morgan, Benjamin (University of Wolverhampton, 2020-05-21)
      This interim briefing presents initial findings from a project exploring the support available to migrants with no recourse to public funds during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research included a survey of local authorities in England, and a call for evidence from migrant support organisations in England, Scotland and Wales. More than 90 percent of local authorities had not shared information about support for people with NRPF during the pandemic, and support organisations reported that service users had struggled to access food, shelter and subsistence support during the pandemic.
    • Local authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic: research report

      Dickson, Eve; Jolly, Andrew; Morgan, Benjamin; Qureshi, Fizza; Sojka, Bozena; Stamp, Dave (ICRD, 2020-08-03)
    • London’s children and young people who are not British citizens: A profile

      Jolly, Andrew; Thomas, Sian; Stanyer, James (Greater London Authority, 2020-01-09)
      This report outlines an updated estimate of the numbers of young Londoners who are foreign-born, or foreign nationals, and disaggregates the likely numbers who are undocumented and who are nationals of EEA+ countries. The report outlines which London boroughs have particular concentrations of children and young people from a migrant backgound and concludes with a discussion about how many have taken up the various regularisation pathways that are available to them.
    • Making for Change: an independent evaluation of Making for Change: skills in a fashion training & manufacturing workshop

      Caulfield, Laura; Curtis, Kerry; Simpson, Ella (London College of Fashion, UAL, 2018-01-31)
      Making for Change Fashion Training and Manufacturing Workshop is a partnership between HM Prison Service and London College of Fashion, UAL (LCF). Making for Change takes an innovative approach in prison, linked to improving the engagement of women offenders in prison industries by providing training in fashion production skills and accrediting participants with industry-recognised qualifications; offering a route away from re-offending whilst simultaneously addressing the skills shortage within the UK fashion manufacturing industry.
    • Multiple and complex needs in the West Midlands: individuals with lived experience tell their story

      Caulfield, Laura; Massie, Rachel (University of Wolverhampton/ West Midlands Combined Authority, 2019-04-01)
    • Multiple and complex needs in the West Midlands: Research briefing paper

      Hopley, Rachel; Caulfield, Laura (University of Wolverhampton, 2021-01)
    • Music, education, and opportunity

      Caulfield, Laura; Haigh, Katy (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2018-09-10)
      Good Vibrations: what we do Good Vibrations is a charity known for its use of gamelan music in criminal justice settings. The gamelan is an orchestra of percussion instruments from Indonesia, made up of various metallophones, xylophones, gongs and drums. You can see and hear one at HMP Peterborough here: https://www.goodvibrations.org.uk/watchsome- clips/watch-a documentary-on-a-typicalgamelan- in-prison-project/
    • Opening the ‘black box’: Organisational adaptation and resistance to institutional isomorphism in a prime-led employment services programme

      Rees, James; Taylor, Rebecca; Damm, Chris (SAGE, 2022-08-17)
      The UK’s Work Programme (2012-18) was a major employment services programme, inspired by new public management principles. A relatively small number of directly commissioned ‘prime providers’ were paid by the central Government largely according to the number of job-outcomes their service users achieved but were given a ‘black box’ to design their own services and subcontracting arrangements. Drawing on an empirical study of subcontracted service providers, and focusing on those from the third sector, the paper shows that within this prime-led commissioning model, subcontractors came under sustained pressure to adjust their operational practices. We draw on institutional isomorphism to show that isomorphic pressures were experienced because of both the design and implementation of the Work Programme. Although there were strong pressures pushing towards convergence, however, the different starting positions of subcontractors meant that these changes were not entirely deterministic and some attempts at resistance were observed amongst third sector providers. Their diverse institutional contexts, including positioning and wider interest in the field, shaped how they navigated and responded to isomorphic pressures, ultimately mitigating homogenisation. The paper contributes a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which provider organisations experience, interpret and respond to structural pressures within an evolving quasi-market. The findings have implications for public service reform programmes featuring quasi-markets that are intended to encourage innovation and a diversity of provision, particularly when promoting mission-led, third sector organisations (TSOs).
    • Participatory filmmaking in voluntary sector research: innovative or problematic?

      Vita, Terry; Andrew, Jolly (Policy Press, 2019-08-29)
      This paper draws both on the authors’ experiences of making a participatory film exploring collective leadership in diverse communities, and on a world café style workshop at the 2018 Voluntary Sector and Volunteering Research Conference organised by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations and the Voluntary Sector Studies Network. The intention is to provoke dialogue about the opportunities and challenges of participatory filmmaking as a research method, and whether it is an appropriate methodological approach for voluntary sector research, with the potential to advance thinking on about and the use of mixed-media methods.
    • The perceived benefits of an arts project for health and wellbeing of older offenders

      Wilkinson, DJ; Caulfield, LS; Department of Psychology, University of Worcester , Worcester , United Kingdom. (Leibniz-Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID), 2017-03-03)
      © 2017, PsychOpen. All rights reserved. The increasing ageing prison population is becoming a pressing issue throughout the criminal justice system. Alongside the rising population, are a host of health and wellbeing issues that contribute to older offenders needs whilst in prison. It has been recommended that meaningful activities can have positive effects on this population and therefore this paper uniquely reviews older offenders accounts of taking part in an arts based project, Good Vibrations, whilst imprisoned. The Good Vibrations project engages individuals in Gamelan music making with an end of project performance. This study used independent in-depth interviews to capture the voices of older offenders who took part in an art based prison project. The interview data was analysed using thematic analysis, which highlighted themes that were consistent with other populations who have taken part in a Good Vibrations project, along with specific age relating issues of mobility, motivation, identity and wellbeing.