• The development of deaf legal discourse

      Stone, Christopher; Mirus, Gene; Creese, Angela; Blackledge, Adrian (Routledge, 2018-02-21)
      The Deaf community or sign language using communities manifest superdiversity and translanguaging in ways that intersect with and yet differ from other accounts of superdiversity. In this chapter we explore the historical context of the use of sign language and the emergence of sign language communities from a minority language community context. We use the emergence of the American Deaf community as an example that is typical of many western Deaf communities. We also explore transnationalism with global deaf communities and the emergence of superdiversity in Deaf spaces both in situ and technologically enabled. We then turn our gaze to the case of a Deaf lawyer whom we interviewed. Here we examine schooling and language strategies used by the Deaf lawyer to gain access to a legal education. We describe the types of linguistic devices used by the lawyer and those used by others that he draws our attention to.
    • From the Windrush Generation to the ‘Air Jamaica generation’: local authority support for families with no recourse to public funds

      Jolly, Andrew; Heins, Elke; Rees, James; Needham, Catherine (Policy Press, 2019-07-22)
      Over the past year, immigration has been a continued focus of policy debates in the global north, with governments in Hungary and Italy elected on openly anti-immigration and ‘welfare chauvinist’ platforms. On the other side of the Atlantic the US federal government family separations policy has also been a source of fierce dispute. In the UK, the potential implications of Brexit for EU migrants in the UK and the treatment of the children of the ‘Windrush Generation’ under the hostile (or ‘compliant’) environment has caused particular controversy and the precipitated the resignation of the Home Secretary.
    • Returnees: Unwanted citizens or cherished countrymen

      Sojka, Bozena; Maarja, Saar; Rees, James; Marco, Pomati; Elke, Heins (Policy Press, 2020-07-08)
    • Social inclusion, immigration legislation and social services

      Jolly, Andy; Liamputtong, Pranee (Springer, 2021-05-06)
      Undocumented migrants are at particular risk of social exclusion, both because of the precarity of their immigration status, and because of restrictive welfare policies at a national level, which make it more difficult for non-nationals to access social security and other welfare programs. In the absence of access to other forms of support, health and social care services have a key role in supporting social inclusion for families with an irregular migration status. However, the tension between the focus of immigration legislation on enforcement and control on the one hand; and the emphasis of child welfare legislation on rights and care on the other, can lead to ethical dilemmas for workers in health and social care settings. This chapter discusses how some of these tensions can work out in practice. Using the concept of statutory neglect, it outlines the different forms of social exclusion faced by irregular migrant families, and concludes with a discussion of the implications for the role of health and social care services, with suggestions for how to promote social inclusion for migrant children and families.
    • Voluntary and community welfare

      Rees, James; Macmillan, Rob; Powell, Martin (Policy Press, 2019-01-16)
      Voluntary organisations and community groups have long been involved providing welfare support and services in different fields, although over time their relationships with state, commercial and informal welfare have changed. It is unlikely that their role in the mixed economy of welfare will diminish in the near future. This chapter provides an outline of the nature and scope of voluntary and community welfare, a historical overview of its role, and examines the current context, challenges and prospects faced by voluntary organisations and community groups.