• Social inclusion, immigration legislation and social services

      Jolly, Andy; Liamputtong, Pranee (Springer, 2021-05-06)
      Undocumented migrants are at particular risk of social exclusion, both because of the precarity of their immigration status, and because of restrictive welfare policies at a national level, which make it more difficult for non-nationals to access social security and other welfare programs. In the absence of access to other forms of support, health and social care services have a key role in supporting social inclusion for families with an irregular migration status. However, the tension between the focus of immigration legislation on enforcement and control on the one hand; and the emphasis of child welfare legislation on rights and care on the other, can lead to ethical dilemmas for workers in health and social care settings. This chapter discusses how some of these tensions can work out in practice. Using the concept of statutory neglect, it outlines the different forms of social exclusion faced by irregular migrant families, and concludes with a discussion of the implications for the role of health and social care services, with suggestions for how to promote social inclusion for migrant children and families.
    • Immigration policies: enforcing borders, driving hunger and creating destitution

      Jolly, Andrew; Dickson, Eve; Garande, Kimberley; Richmond-Bishop, Imogen; Singh, Jasber (University of Wolverhampton, 2021-04-30)
      There is a long history of immigration control and welfare conditionality in the UK, but the interaction between immigration policies and food poverty is underresearched. This article outlines the links between immigration control and food poverty or destitution in the UK. Drawing on insights from the existing literature and a structured discussion at a participatory workshop for researchers and practitioners, the article identifies issues for research and practice around the issue of the No Recourse to Public Funds (NRPF) immigration rule and food poverty. We argue that future research should take a rights based approach to immigration and food poverty that engages with both the history of immigration control and the intent of public policies such as the NRPF rule.
    • Local authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic: research report

      Dickson, Eve; Jolly, Andrew; Morgan, Benjamin; Qureshi, Fizza; Sojka, Bozena; Stamp, Dave (ICRD, 2020-08-03)
    • Café Delphi: Hybridising ‘World Café’ and ‘Delphi Techniques’ for successful remote academic collaboration

      Jolly, A; Caulfield, LS; Sojka, B; Iafrati, S; Rees, J; Massie, R (Elsevier, 2020-12-23)
      Developing collaborative and cooperative research across academic disciplines and university administrative boundaries can be a challenge. In an attempt to understand and propose solutions to this challenge, the authors of this paper set out to: test an innovative combination of methods to generate and evaluate ideas and strategies; and to write about the findings using collaborative online methods. During this process universities in the UK moved to online working and so the authors completed this paper through entirely online means. The authors - a team of academic researchers from the University of AAA - came together in sessions designed as a hybrid of World Café and Delphi technique approaches to discuss challenges and solutions. The findings were written up drawing on insights from the use of massively authored papers (also known as ‘massively open online papers’, MOOPs), and online tools to enable remote collaboration. Expert consensus was sought in this project within a group of participants (N ​= ​7) in one university setting to create a MOOP. This paper presents details of the process, the findings, and reflections on this collaborative and cooperative exercise. That this paper was written using the methods discussed within it, highlights the value and success of the approach. In light of the current Coronavirus pandemic and the increased need to work remotely, this paper offers academics useful strategies for meaningful and productive online collaboration.
    • A systematic review of the characteristics and needs of older prisoners

      Wilkinson, Dean; Caulfield, Laura (Emerald, 2020-09-21)
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review and understand what the existing evidence base concludes about the needs of this population. The older prisoner population is growing faster than the older general population and placing a strain on prisons. Much of the existing literature focusses on the health-care needs of, or in-prison initiatives for, older prisoners. Typically, these are responsive and lacking an evidence-based understanding of the characteristics and needs of this group. Design/methodology/approach This paper presents a systematic review of the existing literature on the needs and characteristics of older people in contact with the criminal justice system. After a thorough search and selection process, 21 papers, from 2002 onwards, were included in the final analysis. The review process was structured through (People, Intervention/Exposure, Comparison, Outcome) and reported using (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). Findings The contradictions within the existing evidence base make it difficult to reach firm conclusions about the needs and characteristics of older prisoners. What is clear from the existing research are the relatively high levels of need. There is also some consensus that where older people commit homicide, the victim is likely to be an intimate partner. Overall, there is a need for consistent recording and reporting of characteristics and demographics and more systematic study design. Originality/value This paper has highlighted the key findings and limitations in the existing literature. Future research should make use of secondary official data sources to provide a clearer understanding of the characteristics of this group, their routes to prison, their needs and challenges they present.
    • Local Authority responses to people with NRPF during the pandemic: Interim project findings briefing

      Jolly, Andy; Sojka, Bozena; Dickson, Eve; Qureshi, Fizza; Stamp, Dave; Morgan, Benjamin (University of Wolverhampton, 2020-05-21)
      This interim briefing presents initial findings from a project exploring the support available to migrants with no recourse to public funds during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research included a survey of local authorities in England, and a call for evidence from migrant support organisations in England, Scotland and Wales. More than 90 percent of local authorities had not shared information about support for people with NRPF during the pandemic, and support organisations reported that service users had struggled to access food, shelter and subsistence support during the pandemic.
    • Statutory neglect and care in a pandemic

      Jolly, Andrew (SAGE Publications, 2020-07-23)
      Much has been written about the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in care homes in Europe and North America, with claims that the high mortality rate has been worsened by the policy decisions taken by governments. This essay argues that the concept of statutory neglect is a useful framework for understanding situations where neglect results from law or policy rather than the lack of action by an individual caregiver.
    • The contribution of the voluntary sector to mental health crisis care: a mixed-methods study

      Newbigging, Karen; Rees, James; Ince, Rebecca; Mohan, John; Joseph, Doreen; Ashman, Michael; Norden, Barbara; Dare, Ceri; Bourke, Suzanne; Costello, Benjamin (National Institute for Health Research, 2020-07)
      Background Weaknesses in the provision of mental health crisis support are evident and improvements that include voluntary sector provision are promoted. There is a lack of evidence regarding the contribution of the voluntary sector and how this might be used to the best effect in mental health crisis care. Aim To investigate the contribution of voluntary sector organisations to mental health crisis care in England. Design Multimethod sequential design with a comparative case study. Setting England, with four case studies in North England, East England, the Midlands and London. Method The method included a scoping literature review, a national survey of 1612 voluntary sector organisations, interviews with 27 national stakeholders and detailed mapping of the voluntary sector organisation provision in two regions (the north and south of England) to develop a taxonomy of voluntary sector organisations and to select four case studies. The case studies examined voluntary sector organisation crisis care provision as a system through interviews with local stakeholders (n = 73), eight focus groups with service users and carers and, at an individual level, narrative interviews with service users (n = 47) and carers (n = 12) to understand their crisis experience and service journey. There was extensive patient and public involvement in the study, including service users as co-researchers, to ensure validity. This affected the conduct of the study and the interpretation of the findings. The quality and the impact of the involvement was evaluated and commended. Main findings A mental health crisis is considered a biographical disruption. Voluntary sector organisations can make an important contribution, characterised by a socially oriented and relational approach. Five types of relevant voluntary sector organisations were identified: (1) crisis-specific, (2) general mental health, (3) population-focused, (4) life-event-focused and (5) general social and community voluntary sector organisations. These voluntary sector organisations provide a range of support and have specific expertise. The availability and access to voluntary sector organisations varies and inequalities were evident for rural communities; black, Asian and minority ethnic communities; people who use substances; and people who identified as having a personality disorder. There was little evidence of well-developed crisis systems, with an underdeveloped approach to prevention and a lack of ongoing support. Limitations The survey response was low, reflecting the nature of voluntary sector organisations and demands on their time. This was a descriptive study, so evaluating outcomes from voluntary sector organisation support was beyond the scope of the study. Conclusions The current policy discourse frames a mental health crisis as an urgent event. Viewing a mental health crisis as a biographical disruption would better enable a wide range of contributory factors to be considered and addressed. Voluntary sector organisations have a distinctive and important role to play. The breadth of this contribution needs to be acknowledged and its role as an accessible alternative to inpatient provision prioritised. Future work A whole-system approach to mental health crisis provision is needed. The NHS, local authorities and the voluntary sector should establish how to effectively collaborate to meet the local population’s needs and to ensure the sustainability of the voluntary sector. Service users and carers from all communities need to be central to this.
    • Music, education, and opportunity

      Caulfield, Laura; Haigh, Katy (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2018-09-10)
      Good Vibrations: what we do Good Vibrations is a charity known for its use of gamelan music in criminal justice settings. The gamelan is an orchestra of percussion instruments from Indonesia, made up of various metallophones, xylophones, gongs and drums. You can see and hear one at HMP Peterborough here: https://www.goodvibrations.org.uk/watchsome- clips/watch-a documentary-on-a-typicalgamelan- in-prison-project/
    • Do challenge and threat evaluations predict netball performance and selection at trials in youth netball players?

      Turner, Martin; Massie, Rachel; Slater, Matthew; Braithwaite, Elizabeth (APA, 2020-10-01)
      In the current paper, we investigated the extent to which challenge and threat evaluations predicted the trials performance of youth netball players. This paper compared two theoretical frameworks, the Theory of Challenge and Threat States in Athletes (TCTSA) and the BioPsychoSocial Model (BPSM) of Challenge and Threat, in their prediction of trials performance. A field-based cross-sectional design was adopted, including self-report psychometric, and observational performance, data. Data were collected prior to the participants’ trials performance. Youth female netball athletes (n = 92, Mage = 13.26 years, SD = 1.55) completed psychometrics concerning challenge and threat evaluations and emotions, in relation to upcoming trials performance. Performance was rated by 10 independent club coaches. Binary logistic and linear regression analyses revealed that BPSM derived resource evaluations (general self-confidence, general perception of positive challenge, positive disposition) were related to trials performance, whilst TCTSA-derived resource evaluations (self-efficacy, perceived control, goal orientation) were not. Also, a greater perceived ability to cope with demands was positively related to trial outcome. The strongest and most consistent predictor of performance was number of previous trials. The greater number of previously attended trials, the better the participants performed in trials. The findings reveal the importance of BPSM-derived resource evaluations and the perceived ability to cope with demands in the prediction of performance outcomes, over and above the TCTSA-derived resource evaluations. The findings also have important implications for sports teams, athletes, and coaches, who should strive to maximise perceptions of resources and coping abilities in the face of pressure situations, such as trials.
    • Making for Change: an independent evaluation of Making for Change: skills in a fashion training & manufacturing workshop

      Caulfield, Laura; Curtis, Kerry; Simpson, Ella (London College of Fashion, UAL, 2018-01-31)
      Making for Change Fashion Training and Manufacturing Workshop is a partnership between HM Prison Service and London College of Fashion, UAL (LCF). Making for Change takes an innovative approach in prison, linked to improving the engagement of women offenders in prison industries by providing training in fashion production skills and accrediting participants with industry-recognised qualifications; offering a route away from re-offending whilst simultaneously addressing the skills shortage within the UK fashion manufacturing industry.
    • State of the Walsall voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

      Caulfield, Laura; Massie, Rachel (One Walsall, 2019-03-11)
    • Multiple and complex needs in the West Midlands: individuals with lived experience tell their story

      Caulfield, Laura; Massie, Rachel (University of Wolverhampton/ West Midlands Combined Authority, 2019-04-01)
    • An evaluation of Sandwell Youth Offending Service –a creative approach to working with young people

      Caulfield, Laura; Sojka, Bozena; Massie, Rachel (University of Wolverhampton, 2019-10-14)
      Sandwell Youth Offending Service (YOS) work with young people who have very complex life stories. The young people may have committed very serious offences but are also often highly vulnerable to exploitation and have experienced significant trauma. Their experiences can lead to mistrust or suspicion of those in authority and in turn, for practitioners, the challenge of engagement can seem insurmountable. Sandwell YOS therefore argue that an evolution of the current approach is required to more effectively engage, support, and help young people. The new National Standards for youth justice, underpinned by the Youth Justice Board’s (YJB) helpful focus on a ‘child first’ principle support a change in thinking and encourage YOSs to take local initiatives. Sandwell YOS’ vision is to focus on the use of the arts and increasingly reconceptualise the YOS over time into a ‘Creative YOS’. In January 2019 Sandwell YOS were awarded funding from the YJB’s Serious Youth Violence Grant to help increase the use of arts with the cohort. The Institute for Community Research and Development were commissioned to conduct a process and impact evaluation, combining quantitative data to understand if any change was happening with in-depth qualitative interviews to understand how this change might be happening, foregrounding the voice and experience of participants. Most existing research and evaluation studies have looked at the impact of discrete arts programmes. The new creative programme of work being introduced by Sandwell YOS is innovative in working across the whole service with a range of arts and creative activities, and therefore no similar evaluation has previously been conducted.
    • ‘It’s not just music, it helps you from inside’: Mixing methods to understand the impact of music on young people in contact with the criminal justice system

      Jolly, Andrew; Devi-McGleish, Yasmin; Simpson, Ella; Caulfield, Laura (SAGE, 2020-07-02)
      In response to some of the criticisms of previous research into the arts in criminal justice, this paper presents findings from research with a music programme run by a Youth Offending team (YOT). Data was collected on the attendance of 42 participants at YOT appointments - matched against a comparison group - and measures of change over time in musical development, attitudes and behaviour, and well-being. Participants who completed the music programme were statistically more likely to attend YOT appointments than a comparison group. There were statistically significant improvements in participants’ self-reported well-being and musical ability over the course of the project. Effect sizes reached the minimum important difference for quantitative measures. To understand not just if, but how, any impact was achieved, and to ensure the voice of the young people was heard, the quantitative elements of the research were complemented and extended by in-depth interviews with 23 participants.
    • Beyond welfare chauvinism and deservingness. Rationales of belonging as a conceptual framework for the politics and governance of migrants’ rights

      Sojka, Bozena; Carmel, Emma (Cambridge University Press, 2020-07-24)
      This article argues that the politics and governance of migrants’ rights needs to be reframed. In particular, the terms “welfare chauvinism”, and deservingness should be replaced. Using a qualitative transnational case study of policymakers in Poland and the UK, we develop an alternative approach. In fine-grained and small-scale interpretive analysis, we tease out four distinct rationales of belonging that mark out the terms and practices of social membership, as well as relative positions of privilege and subordination. These rationales of belonging are: temporal-territorial, ethno-cultural, labourist, and welfareist. Importantly, these rationales are knitted together by different framings of the transnational contexts, within which the politics and governance of migration and social protection are given meaning. The rationales of belonging do not exist in isolation, but in each country, they qualify each other in ways that imply different politics and governance of migrants’ rights. Taken together, these rationales of belonging generate transnational projects of social exclusion, as well as justifications for migrant inclusion stratified by class, gender and ethnicity.
    • Returnees: Unwanted citizens or cherished countrymen

      Sojka, Bozena; Maarja, Saar; Rees, James; Marco, Pomati; Elke, Heins (Policy Press, 2020-07-08)
    • Firewalls: A necessary tool to enable social rights for undocumented migrants in social work

      Hermansson, Linus; Lundberg, Anna; Gruber, Sabine; Jolly, Andrew; Lind, Jacob; Righard, Erica; Scott, Hanna (SAGE Publications, 2020-05-29)
      Firewalls are clear divisions between border policing and the provision of basic social rights. They have a dual character: to ensure that no information collected with the purpose of safeguarding basic social rights should be shared for immigration control purposes; and that migrants should not be subject to immigration control when being present at, or in the vicinity, of religious, private and public institutions upholding and providing social rights. This article suggests a normative argument for ‘firewalls’ in the context of social work and develops the concept theoretically as a principle practised and negotiated at different scales.