Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Elizabeth A.
dc.contributor.authorSclafani, Valentina
dc.contributor.authorPaukner, Annika
dc.contributor.authorKaburu, Stefano S. K
dc.contributor.authorSuomi, Stephen J.
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Pier F
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T15:21:48Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T15:21:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-18
dc.identifier.citationSimpson, EA., Sclafani, V., Paukner, A., Kaburu, SSK., Suomi, SJ., Ferrari, PF., (2017). 'Handling newborn monkeys alters later exploratory, cognitive, and social behaviors', Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. 35 pp. 12-19 doi: 10.1016/j.dcn.2017.07.010en_US
dc.identifier.issn1878-9293en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.dcn.2017.07.010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621964
dc.description.abstractTouch is one of the first senses to develop and one of the earliest modalities for infant-caregiver communication. While studies have explored the benefits of infant touch in terms of physical health and growth, the effects of social touch on infant behavior are relatively unexplored. Here, we investigated the influence of neonatal handling on a variety of domains, including memory, novelty seeking, and social interest, in infant monkeys (Macaca mulatta; n = 48) from 2 to 12 weeks of age. Neonates were randomly assigned to receive extra holding, with or without accompanying face-to-face interactions. Extra-handled infants, compared to standard-reared infants, exhibited less stress-related behavior and more locomotion around a novel environment, faster approach of novel objects, better working memory, and less fear towards a novel social partner. In sum, infants who received more tactile stimulation in the neonatal period subsequently demonstrated more advanced motor, social, and cognitive skills—particularly in contexts involving exploration of novelty—in the first three months of life. These data suggest that social touch may support behavioral development, offering promising possibilities for designing future early interventions, particularly for infants who are at heightened risk for social disorders.en_US
dc.formatapplication/PDFen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878929317300440?via%3Dihub#!en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectmother-infanten_US
dc.subjectdevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectplasticityen_US
dc.subjectcommunicationen_US
dc.subjectmaternal sensitivityen_US
dc.subjectneonateen_US
dc.titleHandling newborn monkeys alters later exploratory, cognitive, and social behaviorsen_US
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscienceen_US
dc.date.accepted2017-07-30
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW071218SKen_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-18en_US
dc.source.volume35
dc.source.beginpage12
dc.source.endpage19
refterms.dateFCD2018-12-07T15:21:48Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-07T15:21:48Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
Simpson et al., 2017.pdf
Size:
373.3Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States