Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDevi-McGleish, Yasmin
dc.contributor.authorCox, David J
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-07T16:52:35Z
dc.date.available2018-11-07T16:52:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-09
dc.identifier.citationDevi-McGleish, Y. and Cox, D. J. (2018). “We humbly beg parson… The Use of Restorative Justice in Fraud Offences”, 1718-2018. Internet Journal of Restorative Justice, Special Issue Restorative Justice and Complex Crimes, ISBN: 978-1-911634-05-8, ISSN (online): 2056-2985.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781911634058
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621862
dc.description.abstractRestorative Justice (RJ) has become an increasingly popular alternative to more traditional punishment methods in the last two decades within the Criminal Justice system in England and Wales; often in respect of youth justice and minor crimes which have a clearly defined victim. However, this article will explore the use of restorative justice in cases of financial fraud. Such cases can be particularly complex when identifying culpability within an organisation, and also victims, who may not be aware that they are victims. Corporate and public apologies are not unheard of, particularly with the increasing use of social media platforms, but they have not been widely discussed in relation to RJ. As there is a recognition that RJ entails more than a simple apology, innovative ways of administering RJ will be considered. Alongside discussion of the complexities of using RJ for large-scale financial fraud, the paper will draw on various cases of fraud and the resultant public apology from the early 18th century onward. Several forms of what we now term RJ will be illustrated from before the modern-day resurgence of this type of justice. In most (though not all) of the several examples discussed, there is a clear separation of RJ practices from the formal criminal justice system operating at the time, and this may prove to be a useful guide to the future use of RJ as an adjunct to more legalistic criminal justice processes. Finally, it will be considered whether such apologies could be useful as a restorative intersection with the criminal justice system.en_US
dc.formatapplication/PDFen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRJAll publicationsen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.theogavrielides.com/product-page/the-use-of-restorative-justice-in-fraud-offencesen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectrestorative justiceen_US
dc.subjectfrauden_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
dc.subjectapologyen_US
dc.subjectprinted apologyen_US
dc.title“We humbly beg pardon…” The use of restorative justice in fraud offences, 1718-2018en_US
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.eissn2056-2985
dc.identifier.journalInternet Journal of Restorative Justiceen_US
dc.date.accepted2018-08-08
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW071118YDMen_US
rioxxterms.versionAMen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-08-09en_US
refterms.dateFCD2018-11-07T16:52:36Z
refterms.versionFCDAM


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
IJRJ revised final draft 1.pdf
Size:
419.9Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States