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dc.contributor.authorKhalil, Ibrahim R
dc.contributor.authorKhechara, Martin P
dc.contributor.authorKurusamy, Sathishkumar
dc.contributor.authorArmesilla, Angel L
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Abhishek
dc.contributor.authorMendrek, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorKhalaf, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorScandola, Mariastella
dc.contributor.authorFocarete, Maria Letizia
dc.contributor.authorKowalczuk, Marek
dc.contributor.authorRadecka, Iza
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-23T13:46:37Z
dc.date.available2018-10-23T13:46:37Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-08
dc.identifier.issn1420-3049en_US
dc.identifier.pmid30297641
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/molecules23102565
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621802
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, there has been an increasing interest in oncolytic adenoviral vectors as an alternative anticancer therapy. The induction of an immune response can be considered as a major limitation of this kind of application. Significant research efforts have been focused on the development of biodegradable polymer poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA)-based nanoparticles used as a vector for effective and safe anticancer therapy, owing to their controlled and sustained-release properties, low toxicity, as well as biocompatibility with tissue and cells. This study aimed to introduce a specific destructive and antibody blind polymer-coated viral vector into cancer cells using γ-PGA and chitosan (CH). Adenovirus was successfully encapsulated into the biopolymer particles with an encapsulation efficiency of 92% and particle size of 485 nm using the ionic gelation method. Therapeutic agents or nanoparticles (NPs) that carry therapeutics can be directed specifically to cancerous cells by decorating their surfaces using targeting ligands. Moreover, in vitro neutralizing antibody response against viral capsid proteins can be somewhat reduced by encapsulating adenovirus into γ-PGA-CH NPs, as only 3.1% of the encapsulated adenovirus was detected by anti-adenovirus antibodies in the presented work compared to naked adenoviruses. The results obtained and the unique characteristics of the polymer established in this research could provide a reference for the coating and controlled release of viral vectors used in anticancer therapy.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research (Iraq). This work was also partially funded by the Research Investment Fund, University of Wolverhampton (Wolverhampton, United Kingdom) and the Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.subjectadenovirusen_US
dc.subjectbiodegradable polymeren_US
dc.subjectchitosanen_US
dc.subjectimmunogenicityen_US
dc.subjectγ-PGAen_US
dc.titlePoly-Gamma-Glutamic Acid (γ-PGA)-based encapsulation of Adenovirus to evade neutralizing antibodies.en_US
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalMolecules
dc.date.accepted2018-10-05
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhamptonen_US
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW2323102018IRen_US
rioxxterms.versionNAen_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_US
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-10-08en_US
dc.source.journaltitleMolecules (Basel, Switzerland)
dc.source.volume23
dc.source.issue10
dc.source.beginpage2565
dc.source.endpage2584
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-01T14:18:55Z


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