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dc.contributor.authorLang, Linda
dc.contributor.authorOrton, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorSallah, David
dc.contributor.authorHewitt-Moran, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Dongmei
dc.contributor.authorCullen, Sean
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Sheila
dc.contributor.authorBell, Brian
dc.contributor.authorBell, David
dc.contributor.authorMeeson, Lesley
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ruoling
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-30T09:03:29Z
dc.date.available2018-08-30T09:03:29Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-29
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963
dc.identifier.pmid22206471
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6963-11-352
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621652
dc.description.abstractNational Health Service (NHS) mental health workforce configuration is at the heart of successful delivery, and providers are advised to produce professional development strategies. Recent policy changes in England have sharpened the focus on competency based role development. We determined levels of intervention activities, engagement and competence and their influencing factors in a community-setting mental health workforce. Using a modified questionnaire based on the Yorkshire Care Pathways Model we investigated 153 mental health staff working in Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust. A median score of competence was computed across 10 cluster activities. Low engagement and competence levels were examined in a logistic regression model. In 220 activities, Monitoring risk was the highest rate of engagement (97.6%) and Group psychological therapy/Art/Drama therapy was the lowest engagement (3.6%). The median competence level based on all activities was 3.95 (proficient). There were significant differences in the competence level among professional groups; non-qualified support group (3.00 for competent), Counsellor/Psychologist/Therapist (3.38), Occupational therapists (3.76), Nurses (4.01), Medical staff (4.05), Social workers (4.25) and Psychologists (4.62 for proficient/expert). These levels varied with activity clusters; the lowest level was for Counsellor/Psychologist/Therapist in the accommodation activity (1.44 novice/advance beginner) and the highest for Occupational therapists in personal activity (4.94 expert). In a multivariate analysis, low competence was significantly related to non-qualified community support professions, late time of obtaining first qualification, more frequencies of clinical training, and training of cognitive behavioural therapy. The associations were similar in the analysis for 10 activity clusters respectively. There was a reasonable competence level in the community-setting mental health workforce, but competence varied with professional groups and cluster activities. New staff and other non-qualified support professions need to receive efficient training, and the training content is more important than frequency to increase level of competence.
dc.formatapplication/PDF
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBiomed Central
dc.relation.urlhttps://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6963-11-352
dc.subjectnational health service
dc.subjectoccupational group
dc.subjectcompetence level
dc.subjectmental health team
dc.subjectmental health staff
dc.titleA survey of engagement and competence levels in interventions and activities in a community mental health workforce in England.
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalBMC Health Services Research
dc.date.accepted2011-12-29
rioxxterms.funderinternal
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW300818RC
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2011-12-29
dc.source.journaltitleBMC health services research
refterms.dateFCD2018-08-30T09:03:29Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-30T09:03:29Z


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