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dc.contributor.authorBellingham-Young, Denise
dc.contributor.authorAdamson-Macedo, EN
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-23T13:12:03Z
dc.date.available2018-07-23T13:12:03Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.issn2175-3598
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621520
dc.description.abstractOfficial classification for low birth weight is 2500 gram or below. Whilst there is no consensus of what constitutes normal birth weight, it has been suggested that the optimal birthweight for long term health is 3500 - 4500 gram; hence those with birth weight between 2500 and 3490 gram could be deemed to be a sub clinical population. The objective was to investigate the relationship between disease and birthweight and to compare vulnerability of those with suboptimal and optimal birthweight in adulthood. This is a cohort study; with cross sectional retrospective design involving 258 adults aged 18-62 who knew their birth weight. Participants completed a minor illness checklist, using a median split, participants were categorised as high or low minor illness group. Results indicate a negative correlation between birthweight and minor illness score (r = -.155, p = .013). Those born with sub optimal birthweight are more likely to report minor illness symptoms above the media score of 16 (OR 1.70 CI 95% 1.04-2.79).It is concluded that there is a relationship between birthweight and level of minor illness in adulthood. Those born with birthweight 2500 - 3490 gram appear to be more vulnerable to minor illness. Thus, working with Foetal Origins theory, it may be possible that this group experienced a degree of foetal compensation, the consequence being that the immune system is compromised. Application of a three dimensional equilibrium model is suggested in designing interventions that improve foetal environment and subsequent health chances.
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dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherJournal of Human Growth and Development
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.revistas.usp.br/jhgd/article/viewFile/50416/54533
dc.subjectbirthweight
dc.subjectminor illness
dc.subjectdevelopmental origin of disease
dc.subjectequilibrium model
dc.titleThe impact of birthweight on adult minor illness: a study on a subclinical population
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Human Growth and Development
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-23T13:12:03Z


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