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dc.contributor.authorUppal, Jaspreet
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-12T08:23:35Z
dc.date.available2018-07-12T08:23:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621485
dc.descriptionA portfolio submitted to The University of Wolverhampton for the Practitioner Doctorate in Counselling Psychology Award: D.Couns.Psych.
dc.description.abstractThis research aimed to identify the factors that predict the well-being of parents/carers of children with Down syndrome. It was hoped that this would increase the understanding around what factors impact the well-being of such families and also influence future interventions and supports that may be available for these families. In total, 100 participants took part in this survey study that measured the impact of psycho-social factors, individual differences in carers, deprivation and the support needs of the child. Data was analysed using regression analysis to explore relationships between carer well-being and the listed factors. The analysis revealed that resilience was the strongest predictor of carer well-being, suggesting that higher resilience levels results in higher well-being. In addition, being a male carer, with a younger child with Down syndrome who has lower levels of behaviours that challenge is predictive of better well-being. Although not all factors were found to be significant overall, this study does highlight the importance of psycho-social factors and individual differences in the carer and child in relation to well-being. Finally, the findings suggest that the impact of deprivation and carer hardship on well-being could be an area of further research.
dc.language.isoen
dc.titlePredicting the Well-Being of Families with a Child with Down Syndrome
dc.typeThesis or dissertation
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-18T13:59:10Z
html.description.abstractThis research aimed to identify the factors that predict the well-being of parents/carers of children with Down syndrome. It was hoped that this would increase the understanding around what factors impact the well-being of such families and also influence future interventions and supports that may be available for these families. In total, 100 participants took part in this survey study that measured the impact of psycho-social factors, individual differences in carers, deprivation and the support needs of the child. Data was analysed using regression analysis to explore relationships between carer well-being and the listed factors. The analysis revealed that resilience was the strongest predictor of carer well-being, suggesting that higher resilience levels results in higher well-being. In addition, being a male carer, with a younger child with Down syndrome who has lower levels of behaviours that challenge is predictive of better well-being. Although not all factors were found to be significant overall, this study does highlight the importance of psycho-social factors and individual differences in the carer and child in relation to well-being. Finally, the findings suggest that the impact of deprivation and carer hardship on well-being could be an area of further research.


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