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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Simon J.
dc.contributor.editorGrimshaw, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:25:02Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:25:02Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-27
dc.identifier.citationIn: Grimshaw, M. (Ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Virtuality: 463-480
dc.identifier.isbn9780199826162
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621398
dc.description.abstractThis chapter discusses and progresses through an aesthetic enquiry into a relationship between the virtual and the actual surface of painting. It is through the inherent temporality of both painting and cinema that the notion of a dynamic duration is interrogated. At the core of this investigative methodology the philosophies of both Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze are employed to examine how duration in painting can be experienced outside of the static recollection. Fundamentally this follows Deleuze’s seminal writing about the cinematic and the function of the image in relation to time. The author accepts Deleuze’s invitation to employ his concepts as a toolbox for dynamism. Thus a model is assembled in which the notion of the “recollection-image” and its relationship to the temporality of the “movement-image” is developed through the potential of the figural as a space between the figurative and the abstract in painting.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.subjectpainting
dc.subjectvirtual image
dc.subjectactual image
dc.subjectcrystal image
dc.subjectcinematic
dc.subjectGilles Deleuze
dc.subjectduration
dc.subjectformalism
dc.subjectfigural
dc.titlePainting, the Virtual, and the Celluloid Frame
dc.title.alternativeThe Oxford Handbook of Virtuality
dc.typeChapter in book
pubs.edition1st Edition
pubs.place-of-publicationNew York, US
dc.source.beginpage463
dc.source.endpage480
html.description.abstractThis chapter discusses and progresses through an aesthetic enquiry into a relationship between the virtual and the actual surface of painting. It is through the inherent temporality of both painting and cinema that the notion of a dynamic duration is interrogated. At the core of this investigative methodology the philosophies of both Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze are employed to examine how duration in painting can be experienced outside of the static recollection. Fundamentally this follows Deleuze’s seminal writing about the cinematic and the function of the image in relation to time. The author accepts Deleuze’s invitation to employ his concepts as a toolbox for dynamism. Thus a model is assembled in which the notion of the “recollection-image” and its relationship to the temporality of the “movement-image” is developed through the potential of the figural as a space between the figurative and the abstract in painting.


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