Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRenshaw, John
dc.contributor.authorEaton, Georgette
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Pete
dc.contributor.authorKilner, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-19T13:56:14Z
dc.date.available2018-06-19T13:56:14Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-01
dc.identifier.citationDoes the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application improve confidence in bystanders performing CPR? British Paramedic Journal, 3(1), pp. 1-7.
dc.identifier.issn1478-4726
dc.identifier.doi10.29045/14784726.2018.06.3.1.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621341
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has poor prognosis and patients rarely survive unless they receive immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation from bystanders. In 2012, the British Heart Foundation launched its PocketCPR training application to simplify bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and overcome barriers to resuscitation. This study investigates whether the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application improves the confidence of bystanders who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation during simulated resuscitation attempts. Methods: This is a mixed method study using a randomised crossover trial with questionnaire analysis. One hundred and twenty participants were randomised to either perform two minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a resuscitation manikin using the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR application or perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation without instruction. Participants completed a questionnaire to capture their confidence before completing the opposite arm of the study. Each participant then completed a second questionnaire to allow for comparison of levels of confidence. Results: Participants in this study were more confident in their overall performance of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation using the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application compared to performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation without instruction (mean confidence score (0‐100): 50.41 with PocketCPR and 43.92 without (p = 0.026)). They were also more confident that the number of chest compressions in this study was correct (mean: 60.39 with PocketCPR vs. 46.10 without (p < 0.001)), and in the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation without having recent cardiopulmonary resuscitation training (mean: 48.67 with PocketCPR vs. 39.79 without (p < 0.002)). Conclusion: The British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application improved the confidence of bystanders performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation during simulated resuscitation attempts.
dc.formatapplication/PDF
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherIngenta Connect
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.29045/14784726.2018.06.3.1.1
dc.subjectbystander
dc.subjectconfidence
dc.subjectCPR
dc.subjectPocketCPR
dc.titleDoes the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application improve confidence in bystanders performing CPR?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalBritish Paramedic Journal
dc.date.accepted2018-03-22
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW19062018PG
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11-11
dc.source.volume3
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage7
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:01:27Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-20T02:33:06Z
html.description.abstractObjectives: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has poor prognosis and patients rarely survive unless they receive immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation from bystanders. In 2012, the British Heart Foundation launched its PocketCPR training application to simplify bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and overcome barriers to resuscitation. This study investigates whether the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application improves the confidence of bystanders who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation during simulated resuscitation attempts. Methods: This is a mixed method study using a randomised crossover trial with questionnaire analysis. One hundred and twenty participants were randomised to either perform two minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a resuscitation manikin using the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR application or perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation without instruction. Participants completed a questionnaire to capture their confidence before completing the opposite arm of the study. Each participant then completed a second questionnaire to allow for comparison of levels of confidence. Results: Participants in this study were more confident in their overall performance of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation using the British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application compared to performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation without instruction (mean confidence score (0‐100): 50.41 with PocketCPR and 43.92 without (p = 0.026)). They were also more confident that the number of chest compressions in this study was correct (mean: 60.39 with PocketCPR vs. 46.10 without (p < 0.001)), and in the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation without having recent cardiopulmonary resuscitation training (mean: 48.67 with PocketCPR vs. 39.79 without (p < 0.002)). Conclusion: The British Heart Foundation PocketCPR training application improved the confidence of bystanders performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation during simulated resuscitation attempts.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Does_the_British_Heart_foundat ...
Size:
254.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/