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dc.contributor.authorAziz, Hamwar
dc.contributor.authorMorrissey, Hana
dc.contributor.authorBall, Patrick
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-22T11:36:34Z
dc.date.available2018-05-22T11:36:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-30
dc.identifier.citationAziz, H., Morrissey, H., Ball, P. (2018) 'The effect of digital social entertainment on students' emotional well-being in higher education', International Journal of Current Research, 10 (4) pp.67562-67567
dc.identifier.issn0975-833X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621292
dc.description.abstractDigital Social Entertainment and Media is a broad term that covers multiple aspects which people use to interact with each other. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of students in higher education on the effect of digital social entertainment on their well-being. The study was a qualitative, questionnaire based included close-, case-based and open-ended questions. The questionnaire was administered to 112 University students who are studying at the University of Wolverhampton. The results showed that 93% used social media and most common reason was to contact family/friends. Most students responded to social media communications after midnight and 77% said they felt relaxed after watching a period of television for more than one hour. Music was also high ranked as a mean to improve mood. Most participants indicated that they would close all social media connections when affect their emotional well-being. This study concluded that DSEM is a common source affect lives of many people to different levels and extent, however the 57% of participants had positive experience on scale of 4 and 5 out of 5. They described it as the mean to remain connected to their loved ones, as important source for their learning and motivates people to change e.g. go to the gym. Fewer participants (29%, on scale of 4 and 5 out of 5) reported negative effects due to online pressure, bullying and reduction in face-to-face communication. Further larger scale study is required to confirm these findings.
dc.formatapplication/PDF
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Current Research
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journalcra.com/article/effect-digital-social-entertainment-students%E2%80%99-emotional-well-being-higher-education
dc.subjectDigital social media
dc.subjectDigital entertainment media
dc.subjectHigher education students
dc.subjectEmotional well-being
dc.titleThe effect of digital social entertainment on students' emotional well-being in higher education
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Current Research
dc.date.accepted2018-03-08
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW22052018HM
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11-11
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage67562
dc.source.endpage67567
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:23:24Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T15:26:29Z
html.description.abstractDigital Social Entertainment and Media is a broad term that covers multiple aspects which people use to interact with each other. The aim of this study was to explore the perception of students in higher education on the effect of digital social entertainment on their well-being. The study was a qualitative, questionnaire based included close-, case-based and open-ended questions. The questionnaire was administered to 112 University students who are studying at the University of Wolverhampton. The results showed that 93% used social media and most common reason was to contact family/friends. Most students responded to social media communications after midnight and 77% said they felt relaxed after watching a period of television for more than one hour. Music was also high ranked as a mean to improve mood. Most participants indicated that they would close all social media connections when affect their emotional well-being. This study concluded that DSEM is a common source affect lives of many people to different levels and extent, however the 57% of participants had positive experience on scale of 4 and 5 out of 5. They described it as the mean to remain connected to their loved ones, as important source for their learning and motivates people to change e.g. go to the gym. Fewer participants (29%, on scale of 4 and 5 out of 5) reported negative effects due to online pressure, bullying and reduction in face-to-face communication. Further larger scale study is required to confirm these findings.


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