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dc.contributor.authorHambler, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-09T16:00:35Z
dc.date.available2018-05-09T16:00:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-15
dc.identifier.citationNeutrality and Workplace Restrictions on Headscarves and Religious Dress: Lessons from Achbita and Bougnaoui 2018, 47 (1):149 Industrial Law Journal
dc.identifier.issn0305-9332
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/indlaw/dwx033
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621269
dc.description.abstractBans on the wearing of religious symbols, and particularly the Islamic headscarf, in the European public square have been controversial and have been challenged on several occasions on human rights grounds (primarily under Article 9 (Freedom of thought, conscience and religion) of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)).1 However, restrictions on religious dress in the workplace have been fully considered only recently, most significantly before the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in Eweida and Ors v United Kingdom.2 In its judgment, the Court concluded that the right to manifest religion through dress could be restricted,3 in situations where there was a health and safety concern but not in situations where customer image was the justification for any restrictions—regarding the latter, the religious right carried more weight than the employer’s desire for uniformity....
dc.formatapplication/PDF
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/ilj/article/47/1/149/4829320
dc.subjectReligious dress
dc.subjectheadscarf
dc.subjectreligious discrimination
dc.subjectCJEU
dc.subjectArticle 9 ECHR
dc.titleNeutrality and Workplace Restrictions on Headscarves and Religious Dress: Lessons from Achbita and Bougnaoui
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Law Journal
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Wolverhampton
dc.date.accepted2018-01-03
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUOW090518AH
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-01-29
dc.source.volume47
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage149
dc.source.endpage164
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T09:12:35Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
html.description.abstractBans on the wearing of religious symbols, and particularly the Islamic headscarf, in the European public square have been controversial and have been challenged on several occasions on human rights grounds (primarily under Article 9 (Freedom of thought, conscience and religion) of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR)).1 However, restrictions on religious dress in the workplace have been fully considered only recently, most significantly before the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in Eweida and Ors v United Kingdom.2 In its judgment, the Court concluded that the right to manifest religion through dress could be restricted,3 in situations where there was a health and safety concern but not in situations where customer image was the justification for any restrictions—regarding the latter, the religious right carried more weight than the employer’s desire for uniformity....


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