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dc.contributor.authorWest, Marion
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T11:02:51Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T11:02:51Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-25
dc.identifier.issn2536-4758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/621235
dc.description.abstractThis article explores a particular interactional practice surrounding advice in undergraduate supervision. Script proposals allow advice-givers to individualise their advice, minimise resistance and provide a model while not undermining the client’s agency (Emmison, Butler and Danby 2011). This device has been studied primarily in helpline interactions (Hepburn, Wilkinson and Butler 2014) but not yet in higher education. The audio-recorded data are from a meeting in which the tutor addresses student concerns regarding her writing process and referencing conventions. Several hallmarks of script proposals are present, including the student’s previously displayed stance, the use of idiom, three part-lists (Jefferson 1990) and contrastive pairs. Membership categories are exploited to both include and exclude the student. The enactment of supervisory roles and qualities such as empathy is analysed and then discussed through the conceptual lens of the psychological contract (Cureton and Cousin 2012) and the educational alliance (Telio, Ajjawi and Regehr 2015). While also fulfilling her tutor-mentor role, in that she supports the student in her own decisions, the tutor acts as director or project manager (Derounian 2011), taking the student through the steps in the process in a logical order (Rowley and Slack 2004). The implications for practical applications are briefly considered.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherHacettepe University
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.efdergi.hacettepe.edu.tr/index.php
dc.subjectscript proposal
dc.subjectundergraduate
dc.subjectsupervision
dc.subjectadvice
dc.titleScript proposals in undergraduate supervision
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalHacettepe University Journal of Education on "Conversation Analytic Studies on Teaching and Learning Practices: International Perspectives"
dc.date.accepted2018-03-01
rioxxterms.funderUniversity of Wolverhampton
rioxxterms.identifier.projectUoW220418MW
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2018-07-01
dc.source.volume34
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage179
dc.source.endpage196
refterms.dateFCD2018-10-19T08:34:27Z
refterms.versionFCDAM
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-01T00:00:00Z
atmire.accessrights
html.description.abstractThis article explores a particular interactional practice surrounding advice in undergraduate supervision. Script proposals allow advice-givers to individualise their advice, minimise resistance and provide a model while not undermining the client’s agency (Emmison, Butler and Danby 2011). This device has been studied primarily in helpline interactions (Hepburn, Wilkinson and Butler 2014) but not yet in higher education. The audio-recorded data are from a meeting in which the tutor addresses student concerns regarding her writing process and referencing conventions. Several hallmarks of script proposals are present, including the student’s previously displayed stance, the use of idiom, three part-lists (Jefferson 1990) and contrastive pairs. Membership categories are exploited to both include and exclude the student. The enactment of supervisory roles and qualities such as empathy is analysed and then discussed through the conceptual lens of the psychological contract (Cureton and Cousin 2012) and the educational alliance (Telio, Ajjawi and Regehr 2015). While also fulfilling her tutor-mentor role, in that she supports the student in her own decisions, the tutor acts as director or project manager (Derounian 2011), taking the student through the steps in the process in a logical order (Rowley and Slack 2004). The implications for practical applications are briefly considered.


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